LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Tag: Hybrid Vehicles

VIA-Motors-Web.jpg

The State of Electrified Pickup Trucks in the North American Market

While a growing number of utility fleets are purchasing electrified passenger cars – like the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf – and bucket trucks with plug-in electric power takeoff capabilities, one vehicle segment still seems out of reach for electrification for most fleets: light-duty pickup trucks.

But there have been some new developments in this space that could have important implications for utility fleets. Workhorse Group says that it will unveil a concept electric truck this May at the ACT Expo in Long Beach, Calif. Earlier this year, Ford announced that it would offer a plug-in hybrid-electric version of the F-150 pickup. And XL Hybrids recently introduced a plug-in hybrid system designed for half-ton pickups.

So, what exactly are the prospects for electrified pickup trucks in North America? What are some of the key challenges to widespread fleet adoption? And when can we expect electrified pickups to become more cost-competitive with conventional-fueled trucks?

UFP recently spoke with Scott Shepard, senior research analyst with global market research and consulting firm Navigant Research (www.navigantresearch.com), to get his outlook.

UFP: Usually when fuel prices are low, there’s less interest in alternative-fuel vehicles. But we’re seeing a different trend with EVs, when you consider that about 400,000 people have paid deposits for the upcoming Tesla Model 3 and there’s a lot of buzz around the new Chevrolet Bolt and other electric passenger vehicles. On a macro level, what do you think is driving this interest in EVs despite current fuel prices?

Scott Shepard: With plug-in vehicles, the plug allows some conveniences that the conventional vehicle cannot allow – meaning that, with plug-in hybrids, you don’t have to go to the gas station that much anymore. Whether it saves you money or not, you can do most of your refueling at home. Therefore, electric vehicles are able to sidestep that whole refueling aspect.

Also, you can get some cheap electricity rates, depending on what utility service territory you’re in and how your vehicle is aggregated in the demand response program. That’s not for a majority of the market, but there is the potential there to make your energy costs so low that lower gas prices don’t register for you.

UFP: Yet in the pickup truck segment, electrification seems to be hitting a wall. Why is that?

SS: When you do the math on pickup trucks, the battery price point that would make the plug-in hybrid or the battery-electric-powered truck competitive against a conventional competitor is still below where battery prices are today.

The price points we look at suggest that you’re really not going to be within a competitive range within a few more years. When we plot out where the current technologies stand against each other, the plug-in hybrid truck and the battery-electric-powered truck have certain capability requirements that require stronger or more energy-dense batteries or larger batteries. They not only need to get you the range that you would expect from an electric passenger car, but you need to have that range competitive with your standard truck – to get to 200 to 300 miles. It’s a big cost, and it’s not easily overcome yet.

UFP: When do you see the price point of plug-in electric pickups becoming more acceptable for wider-spread adoption in utility fleets?

SS: I don’t see anything coming to the market really in the next two to three years, and even that is maybe a little bit aggressive to say three years. The reason is that whenever anyone comes to the market with an idea or a prototype that is a digital rendering, I add about three years to that expected deployment date. It takes a long time for these ideas to actually find good footing.

For these trucks to become more mainstream, it’s not going to start for a while. The rationale behind that is largely the added-on power and range requirements that these vehicles have to meet to even come to market. That doesn’t mean it’s not going to happen. I think you’re looking out to 2025 or even 2030 before you get to the point where batteries are providing the same number of miles as an internal combustion engine. Then you’ve hit the point where this option is actually viable.

At Navigant, we estimate 2016 light truck/SUV-class PHEV sales in North America were 11,500, with sales looking to double in 2017, 2018 and 2019. And our baseline projection places this class/technology sales figure at just under 300,000 by 2025.

UFP: In his “Master Plan, Part Deux,” Tesla CEO Elon Musk wrote that Tesla was going to include an electric pickup in their product mix. What are your thoughts on that?

SS: Given their timeline for new vehicle development, I would estimate that product would be about six to seven years out. [The pickup truck segment] is definitely a market that needs a vehicle – it represents nearly 30 percent of the U.S. market. So even if you’re just scratching the surface of this market, that’s huge. And nobody’s really figured out the right way to do it yet.

I think the right way to do it is probably to do it through some plug-in hybrid arrangement. And I think that’s going to come eventually from one of the established OEMs, like GM or Ford, maybe even Chrysler. Yes, if Tesla does it, that’s great. But I don’t think they’ll see near the amount of success that they’ve seen with their other vehicles.

Qualcomm-1-Web.jpg

Could Cutting the Cord Accelerate Electric Vehicle Growth?

If your fleet operates plug-in electric vehicles (EVs) – or is planning to do so – there’s an emerging technology you’ll want to put on your radar that could impact your vehicle selection and charging infrastructure decisions within the next year or two.

It’s wireless EV charging, which proponents believe holds the key to widespread transportation electrification.

That’s because one of the friction points of operating EVs is the inconvenience of charging with a conventional cord and plug-in system, said David Schatz, vice president of business development and sales for WiTricity (http://witricity.com), a firm that develops wireless charging systems for EVs, headquartered in Watertown, Mass.

Schatz cites a major automaker’s internal study that found that 70 percent of all plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) owners never plug in and opt for fueling only with gas because of the “inconvenience” of plugging in their vehicle.

The idea here is that if you cut the cord, you make EV charging more acceptable to a larger market because you’re not forcing users to change their behavior. “PHEV and EV drivers simply park over a charging pad in their garage, or at work, or at a shopping center and charge up with no hands, no effort,” Schatz said.

Wireless charging uses electromagnetic induction to transfer energy from the primary coil – that’s encased in a pad on the garage floor or ground surface of a parking area – to a secondary coil that’s installed on the vehicle’s undercarriage. When the vehicle is parked in the proper position – with the secondary coil directly over the primary coil – an indicator light goes on and charging begins.

Most major automakers are developing wireless EV charging systems, with a few of the OEMs introducing wireless capabilities in the next year or so, including Mercedes with the S550e plug-in hybrid and BMW with the i3 electric vehicle and i8 plug-in hybrid. Evatran LLC (www.pluglesspower.com) has been selling its Plugless Level 2, a retrofit wireless charging system available for Tesla Model S, Nissan Leaf, Chevrolet Volt and Cadillac ELR.

Experts Peer Into Their Crystal Ball
So, what developments can we expect in wireless EV charging in the next five years? How will it impact growth in the EV market? UFP reached out to industry experts to get their outlook.

“In the next few years, we should see the rollout of wireless charging as an option for plug-in vehicles,” said Lisa Jerram, principal research analyst for Navigant Research (www.navigant.com). “I think it’ll be more widespread among the premium [plug-in electric vehicles], but it will be available from other OEMs as well. We’ll also see it being tested in controlled fleet applications. In five years, that could grow to fleet operation in city centers, perhaps electric taxi or rideshare programs. I don’t anticipate it becoming a huge part of the market within five years, but we should see a growing push to use it in electrified urban fleets.”

Andrew Daga is president and chief executive officer at Momentum Dynamics Corp. (www.momentumdynamics.com), based in Malvern, Pa. The company has developed a technology that provides “dynamic charging,” which is currently being tested on a couple municipal electric bus fleets, where vehicles can be recharged wirelessly while they’re in motion or stopped briefly at each stop on the route.

Daga’s outlook: “Every EV produced in the passenger vehicle space will have inductive [wireless] charging technology built in at the production line [in the next five years]. This is not a crystal ball view, it is what we see clearly. We envision that wireless charging is the key to enabling technology that will allow all types of vehicles to become electric, and that it will cause an S-curve adoption acceleration of EVs when fueling becomes an automated background operation. Drivers and fleet operators will not need to think about fueling; it will simply happen. Wireless does for charging what E-ZPass electronic toll collection has done for collecting tolls.”

John Boodhansingh is senior director of product management for Qualcomm (www.qualcomm.com/products/halo), which has developed the Halo Wireless EV Charging (WEVC) system for a number of automakers, including Daimler AG with its upcoming 2018 Mercedes S550e.

“The future of wireless EV charging is bright in the next five years,” Boodhansingh said. “Many automakers have committed to include WEVC, and the number of models that will have WEVC is increasing. And as that increases, that will, in turn, drive the installation of more charging infrastructure for WEVC. At Qualcomm, we view wireless charging as an enabler for the growth of the EV market because it allows drivers to easily and effortlessly charge at home, at work and when visiting retailers. The availability of effortless charging can also help reduce range anxiety because drivers can top off frequently and don’t have to worry about making it to their destination.”

Schatz with WiTricity predicted: “Over the next three years we will first see wireless charging introduced for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, charging at the 3.6-kilowatt level, so the PHEV can be fully charged in just two to four hours. Then we will see electric vehicles in 2018 and 2019 charging at 7.7-kilowatt and 11-kilowatt charge rates, and by 2020 we expect nearly every global carmaker to have introduced or announced vehicles equipped with wireless charging. Wireless charging will mainly be installed in private garages and at fleet depots. But once standardization is achieved [where chargers are compatible across any make and model vehicle], we will see wireless charging parking spots at company parking lots, retail parking lots and other public parking locations.”

The Bottom Line
A lot is expected to happen in wireless EV charging over the next few years that could impact your purchase decisions with electric vehicles and your investments in on-site charging infrastructure. So, stay tuned.

Suizo-PGE-1-Web.jpg

How Plug-In Hybrids Impact Vehicle Maintenance

Utility fleets are leading the way when it comes to the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles – a growing solution for operations that must work around the clock to provide vital services to the general public.

While going green and convenience are definite pluses, plug-ins also enable significant operational savings over conventional vehicles and typically have longer useful lives, according to the Edison Electric Institute. Extending vehicle life also means lengthening purchase cycles and really getting the most value out of these units.

Fewer Parts Provide More Savings
Part of the value of owning and operating plug-ins is reduced maintenance expenses. Manufacturers and fleets agree that electric-based vehicles have lower maintenance costs due to fewer parts and less engine use. Some manufacturers even purposely design their trucks with that in mind.

VIA Motors (www.viamotors.com), for instance, did away with the transmission, starter motor and alternator in designing its “virtually maintenance-free” single-speed, extended-range electric pickup, according to Jeff Esfeld, VIA’s director of national fleet sales and business development. The company currently installs its technology on GM platforms, specifically the Silverado truck and Express van. Installed components are maintenance-free except for coolant. Any component failure is a plug-and-play replacement.

“Maintenance is a function of components,” Esfeld said. “When items are not there, obviously you’re talking of a lower maintenance cost situation.”

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E), which operates 1,500 electric-based vehicles and has even made the plug-in its standard company car, can attest to the maintenance reductions from these models. Dave Meisel, senior director of transportation and aviation services, said the utility hardly uses the internal combustion engine, which has stretched time between oil changes from quarterly to yearly.

On top of fewer moving parts in the electric drive tank, he also noted extended brake life as a result of regenerative braking.

“On an internal combustion, we take our foot off the gas and put our foot on the brake. Now, in many cases, we’re just taking our foot off the gas,” Meisel explained.

Keeping Vehicles in Top Shape
Manufacturers typically service vehicles, but they also provide training to larger fleets with in-house mechanics.

Maintenance for VIA Motors vehicles is done by its dedicated team of master technicians or through specific GM-authorized service centers. The company also trains GM technicians to get them up to speed and to the level of its master technicians, some of whom have come off the production side and moved into service and maintenance because they know the VIA pickup so well, Esfeld said.

Odyne Systems (www.odyne.com), a manufacturer of hybrid systems for medium- and heavy-duty work trucks that is partially owned by Allison Transmission (www.allisontransmission.com), uses Allison’s service and warranty network throughout North America.

The company also offers a two-day course for larger fleets with in-house mechanics.

“It gives them a good base for common repair work,” said Matt Jarmuz, director of sales for Odyne. “If it’s a major issue, we’ll take that to the Allison dealer for repair.”

Using the train-the-trainer model, PG&E spent about three days training its in-house technicians to work on the utility’s electric vehicles. With 63 garages in its service territory and about 380 shop-based and mobile mechanics, PG&E had the vehicles’ manufacturers train some of its best technicians and then let those technicians train their peers on how to work the high-voltage systems.

Jarmuz described the training process as more electrical than mechanical. “It’s a different skill set – troubleshooting wire harnesses and trying to solve issues on a hybrid vehicle versus a mechanical failure where a part’s broken and you have to replace it,” he said.

Preparing Your Fleet for Plug-Ins
Luckily, fleets don’t have to change much to outfit their shops for plug-in vehicle maintenance. For example, PG&E had to purchase specific plug-in tools, but its shops stayed the same.

“The manufacturers were really clear on what we were supposed to have, so we created a high-voltage kit for every garage when they work on a high-voltage unit,” Meisel said.

VIA customers need two specialized pieces of equipment: a custom transmission lift that drops the battery pack and the H bracket, and a special hand-held diagnostic tool. The tool recognizes every GM and VIA part and also codes all their parts and labor jobs. In addition, it has a video camera and light that connect to the company’s technical assistance line. “A technician can actually call and speak to the engineer and tell them what issue they’re having and our guy can see it,” Esfeld said.

Overall, preparing for plug-in vehicles is not a highly complicated process, Meisel said.

“Train your people how to use them, teach your technicians how to work on them, have your hardware in place and have charging infrastructure in place,” Meisel said. “Buying them and fixing them is the easy part.”

About the Author: Grace Suizo has been covering the automotive fleet industry since 2007. She spent six years as an editor for five fleet publications and has written more than 100 articles geared toward both commercial and public sector fleets.

*****

The Payback for Plug-Ins
Are plug-in hybrid vehicles the right fit for your fleet?

A plug-in hybrid system will cost more upfront versus a conventional model, but the initial investment will pay back over the years through reductions in fuel and maintenance.

Payback depends on the application, according to Odyne’s Jarmuz.

“The big thing about plug-ins is the more miles you run or the more hours the vehicle engine operates, the more that you save,” he said. “Primarily, you’re exchanging diesel/gasoline for electricity and you’re extending the mileage intervals – the oil changes and those scheduled maintenance items. So the higher the miles or engine hours, the better the return.”

Jarmuz recommends calculating your direct costs, such as fuel and maintenance, but also factoring in soft costs, which are more difficult to assign a dollar figure and include items such as refueling time and the time a vehicle is out of service while in the shop.

“We see payback anywhere from five to 10 years depending on how often [utility fleets] use the vehicle and number of miles or engine hours per year,” he said.

EEI-Web

Electric Vehicle News

Support Grows for EEI White Paper on Utility Fleets and Electrification
As part of an effort to advance sustainability through fleet adoption of electric vehicles, the Edison Electric Institute has released a white paper, “Transportation Electrification: Utility Fleets Leading the Charge,” that focuses on the electric power industry’s effort to accelerate the expansion of electric transportation in commercial and retail markets, beginning with electric utility fleets.

Written by EEI’s Fleet Electrification Steering Committee comprised of utility fleet directors from across the country, the paper encourages investor-owned electric utilities to meet an industry-wide goal to spend at least 5 percent of annual fleet acquisition budgets on plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and technologies. According to the paper, electrification of the transportation sector is a potential quadruple win for electric utilities and society, potentially enabling electric utilities to support environmental goals, build customer satisfaction, reduce operating costs and assure the future value of existing assets.

The EEI white paper elaborates on the business case for utility fleet electrification as well as the full range of PEVs available for adoption in fleets. It shows that electrification of large utility fleets offers benefits that range from lower operating costs from fuel and maintenance, to extended vehicle life based on their mechanical simplicity, as well as reduced carbon footprint and toxic emissions.

“The electric power industry is a tremendous leader in supporting electric transportation, but we must continue to strengthen our efforts and lead by example,” said EEI President Tom Kuhn. “One way we can do that is by leveraging our industry’s buying power to purchase more PEVs for our fleets. The white paper is a road map for a long-term, coordinated effort to further spur the development of electric vehicle technologies in the transportation market.”

The NAFA Fleet Management Association extended its support to EEI. “This year, NAFA introduced the Sustainable Fleet Standard Program to our membership, and we are in the final stages of its beta phase,” said NAFA President Claude A. Masters, manager, acquisition and fuel at Florida Power & Light. “While NAFA has a fuel-neutral philosophy, the association recognizes that electric vehicles will be a major player in how fleets will reach carbon footprint goals.”

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. also joined with EEI to urge utilities to more than double their current investment in electric utility fleet vehicles. Over the past five years, PG&E noted, the industry has invested approximately $85 million incorporating PEV technologies into utility fleets, or about 1.7 percent of overall utility fleet spending. PG&E and EEI are calling on companies to raise that investment to 5 percent of their total fleet investment, or approximately $1 billion, starting next year.

“Expanding the use of plug-in technologies is one of the most important opportunities we have as a country to continue diversifying our energy usage and achieve our clean energy goals,” said PG&E Chairman and CEO Tony Earley. “Electrifying our fleets is about showing consumers that plug-in technology is thriving and delivers real benefits that make sense for us and our customers.”

PG&E operates the nation’s largest fleet of alternative fuel vehicles and tops the industry with 14 percent of its fleet investment dedicated to plug-in technologies. PG&E’s PEV technology includes electric power-takeoff systems on the utility’s bucket trucks. This technology allows crews to operate all onboard equipment, including the aerial device and auxiliary systems, via a series of batteries, eliminating the need to idle the trucks at work sites. In addition, last year PG&E acquired the utility industry’s first plug-in electric Class 5 utility work trucks from Electric Vehicles International.

“Our experience has confirmed that the business case for fleet electrification is solid,” said Dave Meisel, senior director of transportation services for PG&E. “We are seeing full payback on the increased initial investment in less than five years in most cases. In addition to the fuel savings, we’re seeing dramatically lower vehicle emissions and a better on-the-job experience for our crews.”

EEI has also formed an Electrification Task Force designed to provide technical expertise and share industry best practices and case studies from utilities that have emerged as leaders in fleet electrification. Visit www.eei.org.

Volt Surpasses Half a Billion Electric Miles
Since its launch in late 2010, Chevrolet Volts have traveled more than half a billion all-electric miles. Additionally, based on a General Motors study of more than 300 Volts in service in California for more than 30 months, many users are exceeding the EPA rating of 35 miles of electric vehicle range per full charge, with about 15 percent surpassing 40 miles of range.

Volts that are charged regularly, according to GM, typically drive more than 970 miles between gasoline fill-ups. The 2014 Volt model provides fuel economy of EPA-estimated 98 MPGe (electric) and 35 city/40 highway on gasoline power. In an independent study conducted between July and December 2013, Volt drivers who participated in the Department of Energy’s EV Project managed by Idaho National Labs totaled 1,198,114 vehicle trips, of which 974,692 – or 81.4 percent – were completed without the gasoline-powered generator being used. Visit www.chevrolet.com.

HYBRID NEWS

Understanding PHEV Options
Joe Dalum, president and CEO of Odyne Systems, a manufacturer of hybrid systems for medium- and heavy-duty work trucks, delivered a presentation explaining plug-in electric vehicle technology options for truck fleets at Plug-In 2014 in San Jose, Calif. Dalum’s presentation discussed the medium- and heavy-duty truck market, fleet strategy, vehicle duty cycles and how to select the best plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) solution.

During his presentation, Dalum stressed the importance of duty cycle data acquisition and analysis for determining if a PHEV system is a good fit for a fleet’s vehicle use strategy. He discussed the Green Truck Association’s Hybrid Work Truck Payback Worksheet and other considerations such as EPAct credits, work site safety and ROI, along with factors for comparing hybrid, electric power-takeoff or PHEV solutions, including warranty, safety, performance and applications. Visit www.odyne.com.

DUECO Delivers to PECO
Philadelphia-based PECO, an electric and natural gas utility subsidiary of Exelon Corp. that serves 1.6 million electric and more than 500,000 natural gas customers in southeastern Pennsylvania, has taken delivery of the first of 22 new Terex XT55 bucket trucks with Odyne hybrid power systems supplied by DUECO Inc., a provider of Terex Utilities and Terex Hi-Ranger products.

The 22 trucks are part of a 300-vehicle, $45.4-million U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute and South Coast Air Quality Management District of California award. Odyne is developing and deploying more than 120 plug-in hybrid systems for companies and governmental entities throughout North America as part of the program. The trucks delivered to PECO feature the capability to charge the hybrid batteries at the most opportune time, reducing charging costs and excess demand on the utility grid.

“We are proud to be the first utility in the United States to deploy this type of vehicle through the combined Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute initiative,” said PECO President and CEO Craig Adams. “In addition to our core mission of providing safe and reliable service to our customers, PECO and all of Exelon share a strong commitment to protecting and preserving the environment, and operating a sustainable fleet is a key component of our efforts.” Visit www.dueco.com.

Freightliner Hybrid-Electric Trucks Approved for Incentive Program
The Freightliner M2 106 diesel-electric hybrid truck has been approved for the New York Truck-Voucher Incentive Program (NYT-VIP). In partnership with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, New York State Department of Transportation, New York City Department of Transportation and CALSTART, NYT-VIP provides $19 million in incentives for clean vehicle technologies. The goal of the program is to promote clean air and a sustainable future for New York’s transportation system by accelerating the integration of advanced vehicle technologies in the commercial truck and bus sectors.

“Freightliner M2 106 hybrid trucks are a smart solution featuring innovative technologies that maximize productivity while also benefiting the environment,” said Mary Aufdemberg, director of product marketing for Freightliner Trucks. “Customers who take advantage of the New York Truck-Voucher Incentive Program will realize even more efficiencies that will help lower their overall cost of ownership.”

The Freightliner M2 106 diesel-electric hybrid truck can be configured for a wide variety of bodies for different applications, including utility vehicles. Visit www.freightlinertrucks.com.

NATURAL GAS NEWS

PERC Creates One-Stop Source for Propane Technology News
The Propane Education & Research Council has launched a new website, propane.com, as a source for information about propane safety and newly developed propane-powered technology.

“Propane.com gives our industry a chance to showcase the versatility of propane, and the economic and environmental benefits of using this American-made fuel across top-performing markets,” said Roy Willis, president and CEO of PERC. “The consolidation also gives propane customers the opportunity to realize all the technologies available for businesses.”

Propane.com consolidates information from PERC’s previous sites, including autogasusa.org, agpropane.com, poweredbypropane.com and usepropane.com. Fleets can also use the site’s Find a Propane Retailer application to locate fuel providers by zip code and services provided. Visit www.propane.com.

Quantum Announces New CNG Storage System Orders
Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide has received approximately $600,000 in purchase orders from the WheelTime network for its lightweight natural gas storage systems. Quantum has been the exclusive supplier of compressed natural gas storage systems for aftermarket system conversions to the WheelTime Network, comprised of 18 member companies with more than 180 installation and service locations nationwide. The latest orders expand the relationship to include system installs on new trucks at WheelTime locations. Under an arrangement that began more than two years ago, Quantum and WheelTime have been training and educating the network locations on installs, maintenance and service.

“We are excited to be expanding this relationship with additional orders and especially to include additional WheelTime members and locations,” said Brian Olson, president and CEO of Quantum. “We are working closely with WheelTime on setting up new locations with installation and service training and to provide turnkey system solutions. Our goal is to have this relationship reach all 50 states.”

Quantum also announced it has received its first CNG storage system order from a large Kenworth dealership network with offices in the U.S. and Canada. The purchase order is for Quantum’s frame-rail mounted Q-RailLITE CNG storage vessels. Quantum will train dealerships to install and service the CNG modules.

A newly expanded purchase order from Westport for CNG tanks has also been received by Quantum. “We are expanding our relationship with Westport after being identified as a key fuel storage supplier for their natural gas vehicle programs,” Olson said. Visit www.qtww.com.

Fueling Park Operations with Propane
Mammoth Cave National Park has received a donation of propane-powered off-road and stationary equipment from the Propane Education & Research Council. The donation totals more than $62,000 and includes three John Deere zero-turn mowers, two Generac portable generators and a CleanFUEL USA propane dispenser featuring eConnect, a fuel network management system for electronic dispensers. MCNP also operates eight propane autogas Bluebird school buses and two propane autogas ROUSH CleanTech Ford F-250 pickup trucks.

“We’ve been dedicated to integrating sustainable practices into park operations for many years,” said Russell Runge, MCNP acting superintendent. “PERC’s donation of propane equipment will continue to help us reach our sustainability goals. Not only do the donations help MCNP become more environmentally friendly and better monitor fuel usage, but they also advance the National Park Service’s Green Parks Plan aimed at reducing dependence on foreign oil, mitigating effects of climate change and conserving energy.”

MCNP’s efforts in sustainability began in the late 1990s when it partnered with the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, a Clean Cities Coalition partner. KCFC was instrumental in securing the donation of propane autogas buses. KCFC has been advocating for alternative fuel usage and supporting the National Park Service since the coalition was established in 1993. Visit www.propane.com.

CleanFUEL USA Liquid Propane Injection System Powers Freightliner Products
Full production has begun of two CleanFUEL USA liquid propane injection systems for Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp. S2G medium-duty trucks and Thomas Built C2 school buses. The factory-installed propane autogas systems require no aftermarket modifications.

The FCCC S2G truck and the Thomas Built Saf-T-Liner C2 school bus with the propane systems are powered by an 8-liter engine from Powertrain Integration and are equipped with an Allison 2300 automatic transmission. The engine is rated at 495 pound-feet of torque at 3,100 rpm and 339 horsepower at 4,100 rpm. Visit www.cleanfuelusa.com.

PERC Promotes Clean Propane on Campus
The Propane Education & Research Council has joined the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education to encourage low-emissions propane equipment use in higher education. Through the association of colleges and universities, PERC will inform higher education institutions about the benefits of using clean, low-emissions propane equipment as part of their sustainability initiatives.

“Propane is the leading alternative fuel in the U.S. and helps thousands of businesses, fleets, contractors, and consumers meet their economic and environmental goals,” said Roy Willis, PERC CEO and president. “We want to help bring the same fuel-efficient technologies to campuses through equipment demonstrations, incentives, and educational programs that will help AASHE members significantly reduce their carbon footprint and save money.”

AASHE enables colleges and universities to meet their sustainability goals by providing specialized resources, professional development and a network for sharing information. Many AASHE resources are free to the public, and its programs help support the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. ACUPCC institutions sign a commitment promising to lead their institutions toward climate neutrality. There are more than 650 ACUPCC signatories and 800-plus AASHE members to date.

“AASHE counts on the support of many innovative organizations, such as PERC, to fulfill our mission of creating a cleaner, greener and more sustainable planet, starting with college campuses,” said Stephanie A. Herrera, AASHE executive director. “AASHE business members support the sustainability movement by providing valuable products, services and resources to help move this vital community toward a better future.” Visit www.aashe.org.

Freightliner Trucks Adds to Natural Gas Options
The Cummins Westport ISX12 G heavy-duty natural gas engine will be available as a factory-installed option for the Freightliner 114SD severe-duty truck model in 2015. The 12-liter ISX12 G engine features ratings up to 400 horsepower and 1,450 pound-feet of torque, and operates on CNG or LNG. Factory-installed back-of-cab mounted CNG tanks are available in 60 and 75 diesel gallon equivalent configurations. The 114SD has been available with natural gas with the 9-liter Cummins Westport ISL G engine since 2011.

Freightliner’s commitment to green technologies is part of parent company Daimler AG’s global “Shaping Future Transportation” initiative. Launched in 2007, the initiative is focused on reducing criteria pollutants, carbon dioxide and fuel consumption through the utilization of clean, efficient drive systems including clean diesel and alternative fuels. Since 2008, Freightliner Trucks has sold more 3,500 natural gas-powered trucks and tractors. Visit www.freightlinertrucks.com.

Omnitek Receives EPA Approval for Mack Engine Conversions
Omnitek Engineering Corp. has received a Certificate of Conformity from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for diesel-to-natural-gas engine conversions of all Mack E7 electronic engines up to model year 2006. The approval allows engine conversions to proceed in 49 states and covers 166 Mack E7 engine/model/power variations.

Omnitek will offer 100 percent dyno-tested “drop-in” ready converted engines, configured for quick installation. An assembly line engine remanufacturing/conversion process performed by the company’s strategic partner Reviva will assure that engines are in as-new condition. The Omnitek diesel-to-natural-gas converted Mack E7 engine produces 400 horsepower with low nitrogen oxide emissions of 0.14 gr/bhp-hr, per the EPA SET emissions test protocol, without the use of EGR.

“There is significant pent-up demand for converting Mack E7 diesel engines to natural gas,” said Werner Funk, president and CEO of Omnitek. “Diesel-to-natural-gas engine conversions are a viable and cost-effective option for fleets to transition to natural gas within a practical time frame.

“As engines are converted to use 100 percent natural gas, the payback on a diesel-to-natural-gas truck conversion can be as short as 16 months, including the cost for the engine, fuel storage system and installation labor,” Funk added. “This is a significant improvement compared to diesel dual fuel technology.” Visit www.omnitekcorp.com.

Peterbilt Offers New Natural Gas Powertrain Option
For several of its natural gas vehicles, Peterbilt Motors Co. is now offering an automated transmission and a natural gas engine that can be powered by CNG or LNG. The Eaton UltraShift PLUS and Cummins Westport ISX12 G are available for Peterbilt Models 579, 567, 384 and 365.

The Eaton UltraShift PLUS is available in the 13-speed MHP and 10-speed LAS series, and the 11.9-liter Cummins Westport ISX12 G is available up to 400 horsepower and 1,450 pound-feet of torque. Visit www.peterbilt.com.

Mack Trucks Offers Grant Application Assistance
To help customers maximize their return on investment, Mack Trucks announced it is now working with the Sustainability Initiatives Group to help dealers and customers navigate the grant process and obtain public funding for alternative fuel- and clean diesel-powered vehicles. SIG will maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal and state grant information, offer summaries on relevant grant opportunities, and assist in the grant application and writing process. Visit www.macktrucks.com.

CLEAN DIESEL NEWS

Clean Diesel Trucks Make Up 33 Percent of All Trucks on U.S. Highways
More than one-third of all medium- and heavy-duty commercial trucks registered in the U.S.– 2.9 million of 8.8 million trucks – are now equipped with newer technology clean diesel engines, according to new data compiled by HIS Automotive for the Diesel Technology Forum (DTF). The new data includes registration information on Class 3-8 trucks from 2007 through 2013 in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Beginning in 2007, all heavy-duty diesel trucks sold had to meet particulate emissions levels of no more than 0.01 grams per brake horsepower hour. Emissions from today’s diesel trucks and buses are near zero thanks to more efficient engines, more effective emissions control technology and the nationwide availability of ultralow sulfur diesel fuel, DTF noted. The new clean diesel technology has reduced emissions from heavy-duty diesel trucks and buses by 99 percent for nitrogen oxides and 98 percent for particulate emissions. Visit www.dieselforum.org.

NAFA Requests Extension of Diesel Emissions Reduction Act
The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA), administered through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, provides up to $100 million each year through 2016 for reducing emissions from existing diesel engines. The EPA announced that roughly $9 million is still available for agencies seeking to undergo clean diesel projects, including replacement, repower and retrofit initiatives.

Recently, NAFA Fleet Management Association CEO Phillip Russo reached out to leaders in Washington urging continued funding for the DERA. “Millions of older diesel engines are still in use by fleets,” Russo said. “Thankfully, emissions from these older engines may be controlled with the use of modern control technologies that reduce emissions. If funds are not allowed to be appropriated for DERA, the administration’s 2015 budget proposal will reduce DERA funding from the $20 million contained in the continuing resolution in fiscal year 2014 to zero in 2015. We believe that modest increases in funding for DERA can and must be achieved within the framework of the overall budget agreement approved by Congress late last year, and encourage you to support $30 million in funding for fiscal year 2015.” Visit www.nafa.org.

GREEN EVENTS

Green Truck Summit & The Work Truck Show 2015
March 3-6
Indiana Convention Center
Indianapolis
www.ntea.com/worktruckshow

ACT-Expo-3-Web

Green News

ACT Expo Highlights
Nearly 200 alternative fuel and clean transportation industry leaders were on hand at the Alternative Clean Transportation Expo in May to present information on key advancements in alternative fuels and clean vehicles, including electric, hybrid, hydrogen, natural gas, propane autogas, clean diesel and renewable fuels technologies.

The 2014 ACT Expo, co-located with the NGV Global conference, also provided off-site technical tours of local alternative fuel vehicle and infrastructure projects; fueling, equipment, technology and vehicle displays; and a ride-and-drive with the latest light-, medium-, and heavy-duty alternative fuel and clean technology vehicles. More than 175 suppliers of alternative fuels and clean vehicle technologies sponsored the joint conferences.

A record number of propane autogas exhibitors, including propane autogas retailers and original equipment manufacturers, presented their latest solutions at ACT Expo. Included were Alliance AutoGas, CleanFUEL USA, Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., Icom, Isuzu, New Eagle, Power Solutions International, Powertrain Integration and ROUSH CleanTech.

At the Propane Education & Research Council display, a ROUSH CleanTech E-450 transit shuttle bus and the newly released MT45 strip chassis from Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp. were on display. PERC also showcased new flat-tank fuel storage technology from Propane Performance Industries, an Exmark Lazer Z S-Series propane-powered lawn mower with a Kohler EFI power-plant engine, and a Superior Energy Systems autogas dispenser.

The newest additions to Peterbilt’s lineup of natural gas-powered commercial vehicles, including the vocational Model 567, were on display during the ACT Expo. The 567 is equipped with a Cummins Westport ISX12 G CNG engine and Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide’s back-of-cab CNG fuel storage solution that uses the company’s Q-Lite tank technology and can store 123 diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) of fuel.

Mack’s natural gas-powered Pinnacle models at ACT Expo included axle-back models with both LNG and CNG power supplied by a Cummins Westport ISX12 G engine. Mack Trucks, which also offers natural gas-powered TerraPro models, recently introduced an LR series refuse vehicle and plans to announce a natural gas-powered version of the Mack Granite.

Volvo Trucks showcased a CNG-powered VNL day cab and a prototype dimethyl ether-powered VNL day cab at ACT Expo. Both vehicles are part of Volvo Trucks’ “Blue Power” natural gas strategy for North America. Volvo currently offers CNG- and LNG-powered versions of its VNM day cab and VNL sleeper and day cab models powered by spark-ignited gas engines. The OEM also continues to work toward commercialization of dimethyl ether-powered trucks for the North American market, and is developing a fully integrated natural gas solution, a compression ignition engine that utilizes LNG.

Freightliner Trucks now offers factory-installed LNG fuel tanks for the Cascadia 113 day cab with a Cummins Westport ISX12 G engine and a 155 DGE CNG tank. The company also showcased a Freightliner 114SD CNG roll-off concept truck equipped with the Cummins Westport ISX12 G, and a Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp. S2G liquid propane-fueled chassis with a stake body and crane. Visit www.actexpo.com.

NAFA Pioneers Fleet Sustainability Program
The NAFA Sustainable Fleet Standard Program, developed in conjunction with CALSTART, will allow member organizations to assess how to enhance practices to decrease fuel dependence and emissions while increasing the efficiency of vehicles and reducing costs.

With the new program, notes NAFA President Claude T. Masters, CAFM, fleet services manager at Florida Power & Light Co., NAFA intends to pioneer a movement in the fleet community that emphasizes the economic and environmental benefits of sustainability. “The importance of sustainable practices becomes more evident each day,” he said. “By becoming more energy independent and efficient, our members will extend benefits to their bottom line and their customer base.” Visit www.nafa.org.

Florida Power & Light Wins EPA Award
Florida Power & Light Co. has received the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Excellence Award for 2014, which honors innovative programs that benefit communities, the environment and the economy. In particular, the EPA recognized FPL’s deployment of fuel-efficient vehicle technology, an important part of the utility’s overall efforts to provide electric service to its 4.7 million customers throughout Florida.

FPL operates one of the largest sustainably responsible fleets in the nation with approximately 1,750 biodiesel-powered vehicles and 550 electric and hybrid electric vehicles. In 2013, FPL’s clean-vehicle fleet saved 682,000 gallons of petroleum fuel and prevented more than 6,800 tons of carbon dioxide emissions. Visit www.fpl.com.

HYBRIDS

Odyne Endorsed by Allison, Taps John Deere, Introduces Export Power System
Allison Transmission has endorsed the use of its 3000 and 4000 Series transmissions with the Odyne plug-in hybrid PTO-based system. The Odyne hybrid power system interfaces with Allison Transmission’s fully automatic transmissions.

Hybrid energy is captured in the Odyne system using Remy electric propulsion motors and Johnson Controls’ lithium-ion battery technology and components. The system’s PTO interface provides a direct connection between the hybrid system and the transmission. Odyne’s hybrid system and ePTO can power most equipment for an entire day with the engine off.

Odyne Systems is also working with John Deere Electronic Solutions, previously known as Phoenix International, as a supplier of its JDES PD300 power inverter. The inverter drives the Remy electric motor in the Odyne hybrid system.

Additionally, Odyne is now incorporating export power system technology in its hybrid solution capable of providing up to 6 kilowatts or greater from the hybrid battery system to power large electrical loads, equipment and tools. The system has been tested to 18 kilowatts and is designed for applications up to 36 kilowatts.

The export power capability of the Odyne system potentially eliminates the need for vehicle-mounted or towed generators, or to continually idle the truck to operate engine-driven generators. The system provides consistent power conversion throughout the entire range of the battery charge and will operate without interruption at a work site, even if battery capacity drops, since the hybrid system has the ability to recharge the battery using the chassis engine. Visit www.odyne.com.

Kinetics Hybrid Approved for NYSERDA Voucher Program
The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) has announced that the Crosspoint Kinetics hybrid electric system qualifies for voucher funding. Fleets operating Class 3-8 vehicles in the New York City area can now get up to 80 percent of the system’s cost reimbursed as part of an ongoing initiative to reduce emissions in the region. To qualify for up to $40,000 per truck, the vehicles must be converted to electric, hybrid electric or CNG, and must spend at least 70 percent of their time operating in the five boroughs of New York City.

The Kinetics hybrid system is a bolt-on solution that has undergone testing at FTA/Altoona, CALSTART and Cummins, and in more than 6 million miles of field driving with customers.

The New York City Alternative Fuel Vehicle – Voucher Incentive Fund has earmarked $6 million for the program with NYSERDA, in partnership with the New York City Department of Transportation, the New York State Department of Transportation and CALSTART. Visit www.crosspointkinetics.com.

GREEN VEHICLES

AT&T Deploys 8,000th CNG Vehicle
AT&T recently fielded its 8,000th CNG vehicle, achieving a milestone in the company’s 10-year, $565-million commitment to add approximately 15,000 alternative fuel vehicles to its fleet by end of 2018. The 8,000th CNG vehicle, a 2014 Chevy Express van, will be used in the St. Louis metropolitan area.

In addition to CNG, AT&T has deployed hybrid electric, all electric and extended-range electric vehicles, for a total AFV fleet of more than 10,000 vehicles in 43 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. The company plans to continue to deploy a mix of technologies. Visit www.att.com.

Westport WiNG Receives CARB and EPA Certifications
Westport has received certification from the California Air Resources Board for its 2014 model year Westport WiNG Ford F-150 3.7-liter pickup truck with a dedicated CNG system. The F-150 pickup, which is also certified by the EPA, runs on CNG and is available with 17-gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) or 23-GGE tanks.

Westport has also received certification from the EPA for its 2015 model year Ford F-250 and F-350, 6.2-liter Super Duty trucks with the Westport WiNG bi-fuel CNG system. The F-250 and F-350 trucks run on both gasoline and CNG and are available with 17-GGE or 23-GGE tanks, or a variety of combinations using the underbody tanks. Visit www.westport.com/products/automotive.

Bi-Fuel Options Set for 2015 GMC and Chevrolet Models
A bi-fuel CNG option is available on all 2015 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500HD and 3500HD single-rear-wheel pickup truck models. Express and Savana vans are also available with fully dedicated CNG fuel systems, including three- or four-tank models on the cargo vans.

“Based on current average fuel prices, CNG is more than a dollar cheaper than an equivalent gallon of gasoline, giving fleets an incentive to use CNG to power their vehicles,” said Ed Peper, U.S. vice president, General Motors Fleet and Commercial. “Given the consistent cost savings and expanding infrastructure, commercial interest in CNG vehicles continues to grow.” Visit
www.gmfleet.com.

Omnitek Selected for City of Little Rock Pilot Program
Omnitek Engineering Corp. has been selected for a city of Little Rock, Ark., pilot program intended to demonstrate the economic benefits and environmental effectiveness of the company’s diesel-to-natural-gas engine conversion technology. The converted Navistar DT466E heavy-duty truck engines in the city’s municipal fleet will utilize Little Rock’s new CNG fueling station.
Visit www.omnitekcorp.com.

Quantum to Supply Heavy-Duty OEMs
Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide has announced it will offer natural gas storage systems to the heavy-duty OEM market. In 2013, the company introduced rail-mounted storage systems for medium- and heavy-duty trucks, and in March 2014 it introduced a lightweight back-of-cab storage system. Visit www.qtww.com.

Video Series Features Clean Diesel Technology for Off-Road Engines
The Diesel Technology Forum is launching a 10-part video series highlighting the research, development, and strategies used by leaders in clean diesel technology to produce near-zero emissions in new off-road engines and equipment. The series includes interviews with technology and business executives.

“This year marks a new era for construction and other off-road diesel engines and equipment,” said Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum. “Manufacturers have met the challenge from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to virtually eliminate emissions of particulate matter and nitrogen oxides in the fourth-generation Tier 4 Final emissions standards. There is no better example of innovation and achievement in clean, fuel-efficient technology than what is now available from diesel engine and equipment makers.”

Upcoming videos will feature strategies in achieving the Tier 4 standards from Cummins, Bosch, CASE Construction Equipment, Caterpillar, Deere and Co., FPT Industrial, Isuzu, Johnson Matthey, MTU America, Volvo Powertrain and Yanmar. Visit www.dieselforum.org.

EPA Announces Funding to Clean Up Diesel Engines
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is making available $9 million in grant funding for clean diesel projects. The funding comes from the EPA’s Diesel Emission Reduction Program. Projects may include school and transit buses, heavy-duty trucks and other diesel engines. Visit www.epa.gov.

Worcester RTA Fields Proterra EV Buses
The Worcester Regional Transit Authority, using approximately $7 million of federal and matching state funds from MassDOT, has purchased six Proterra plug-in, all-electric buses. The new buses are expected to emit 130 fewer tons of carbon dioxide annually than models running on diesel, and the RTA estimates a decrease in operating costs of $3 million over 12 years.

The only EV bus manufacturer to have buses in revenue service anywhere in the U.S., Proterra has units running in San Antonio, Tallahassee, Fla., and Pomona, Calif., among other cities, and has announced contracts with Reno, Nev., Nashville, Tenn., and Louisville, Ky. Visit www.proterra.com.

School Districts Replacing Buses with Propane Autogas Models
Broward County Public Schools, the nation’s sixth-largest school district, has purchased 98 propane autogas-fueled buses for high-mileage routes. The county expects a six-month return on investment for the additional cost of the alternative fuel models. Each bus will displace about 40,000 gallons of diesel and emit 150,000 fewer pounds of carbon dioxide over its lifetime. The school district purchased the buses from Florida Transportation Systems, the authorized Blue Bird dealer in Florida. The Blue Bird Propane-Powered Vision models, each equipped with a ROUSH CleanTech fuel system, include a 100-gallon extended-range tank that provides a 93-usable-gallon capacity.

Almost 50 buses fueled by propane autogas will begin operation for the 2014-2015 school year in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. Cleveland Schools, Ohio’s second-largest school district, will replace 12- to 13-year-old diesel buses with Blue Bird’s Propane-Powered Vision buses from Cardinal Bus Sales, Ohio’s Blue Bird dealer. Each bus is equipped with a ROUSH CleanTech propane autogas fuel system, including 20 outfitted with wheelchair lifts. Visit www.roushcleantech.com.

CleanFUEL USA Unveils Fully Integrated Fuel Management System
A complete fuel network management system for electronic dispensers – CleanFUEL eCONNECT – has been introduced by CleanFUEL USA. CleanFUEL eCONNECT features remote access and control capabilities from a computer, tablet or mobile device. The software has dispenser diagnostics and real-time reports. Fleet managers can also customize CleanFUEL eCONNECT to meet specific data collection needs, such as vehicle mileage, fuel consumption and driver controls. Additional CleanFUEL eCONNECT options include keypad entry, card reader, RFID and key fob, as well as integrated printing. Visit www.cleanfuelusa.com.

GREEN EVENTS

AltCar Expo
September 19-20, 2014
Santa Monica, Calif.
AltCar Expo, a free event now in its 9th year, will demonstrate the latest green technology vehicles, including electric, plug-in hybrid, hybrid electric, natural gas, propane, biodiesel, ethanol and hydrogen models.
www.altcarexpo.com

Isuzu-Green-Truck-Summit-Web

Green Truck Summit

The Green Truck Summit, held in conjunction with The Work Truck Show 2014, provided an opportunity for more than 550 attendees to gather information about innovative clean vehicle technologies, alternative fuel trends and upcoming products. Produced by the NTEA and presented by International Truck, the 2014 Green Truck Summit was opened with a keynote address by Patrick Davis, director, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy.

“The choices in fuel-efficient technologies continue to expand,” Davis stated. “As of August 2013 there were 25 tractor, 13 refuse truck, 8 van, 17 transit bus and 18 vocational truck models powered by alternative fuel sources on the market. Fleets are putting more AFVs on the road than ever before and helping displace the use of petroleum. Clean Cities participants, in fact, have surpassed 5.4 billion gallons of fuel savings.”

Broken down by fuel type, Davis reported that the largest percentage, at 60.9 percent of that fuel reduction, was for natural gas engines, followed by biodiesel, ethanol, propane and electric vehicles. The high number for natural gas also reflects an expanding fueling infrastructure, which now includes 1,334 CNG, 90 LNG and 2,978 LPG stations.

“As many as 23 major fleets are now part of the National Clean Fleets Partnership,” Davis related, “and as alternative fuel engine and battery system development continues, the costs for fleets will continue to be reduced while energy density, which has doubled in five years, will continue to grow.”

DOE provides a variety of tools and assistance for fleets at www.afdc.energy.gov, including online calculators for petroleum reduction planning, evaluating return on investment for alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the AFLEET Tool for calculating petroleum use, cost of ownership, and pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Also available are interactive maps of alternative fueling stations and truck stop electrification sites, as well as data search capabilities for researching vehicles, engines, laws and incentives.

Green Truck Leadership Award
Another highlight of the Green Truck Summit was the presentation of the Green Truck Leadership Award to U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan for her contributions to promoting advanced alternative fuels and technologies for work trucks. Senator Stabenow is the sponsor of the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2013, which directs the Secretary of Energy to work toward substantially reducing or eliminating petroleum use by and emissions from passenger and commercial vehicles.

The Work Truck Show 2014 Green Award
The EchoDrive bolt-on hybrid electric kit from Echo Automotive was awarded The Work Truck Show 2014 Green Award, given annually to the product at The Work Truck Show that a panel of trade media and fleet manager judges determines best enhances vocational truck fuel utilization.

EchoDrive is a plug-in system that bolts directly to the vehicle and includes an advanced battery, electric motor, inverter and charger. The components work together to provide torque assistance and recover braking energy. Green Award judges cited EchoDrive for offering a complete fuel-saving package that can easily be added to or removed from existing vehicles. Echo-certified technicians can install EchoDrive in four to six hours using existing mounts.

Attendees were able to test drive a Ford E-250 cargo van equipped with EchoDrive during the Green Truck Ride-and-Drive held as part of The Work Truck Show. Echo Automotive also announced that production is expected to begin in the first quarter of 2015 on EchoDrive systems for 2010-2014 GM 2500 and 3500 vans, including Chevrolet Express and GMC Savana models. Visit www.echoautomotive.com.

2014 Green Truck Ride-and-Drive
Fleet managers at The Work Truck Show and the Green Truck Summit were able to test drive more than 20 sustainable technology vehicles during the event’s Green Truck Ride-and-Drive. The vehicles, available for test drives on city streets and on a closed-access course, included trucks, shuttle buses and vans powered by bi-fuel, CNG, electric hybrid, high-efficiency diesel, hydraulic hybrid, plug-in electric and propane autogas systems.

Suppliers and vehicles participating in the 2014 Green Truck Ride-and-Drive included:
• Allison Transmission – shuttle bus with parallel electric hybrid transmission system
• Altec Industries – aerial device with plug-in hybrid energy management system
• AMP Trucks/Workhorse – electric walk-in van
• Boulder Electric Vehicle – plug-in electric van
• Crosspoint Kinetics – parallel electric hybrid shuttle bus
• Echo Automotive Inc. – plug-in electric hybrid van
• Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp. – ultraclean high-efficiency diesel walk-in van
• Freightliner Trucks – natural gas dump truck
• Hino Trucks – electric hybrid cabover trucks
• IMPCO Automotive – bi-fuel CNG sedan
• International Truck – plug-in electric tractor
• Isuzu Commercial Truck of America Inc. – CNG N-Series truck
• Kenworth Truck Co. – CNG roll-off straight truck
• Lightning Hybrids – hydraulic hybrid shuttle bus
• Odyne Systems LLC – plug-in parallel electric hybrid truck
• Peterbilt Motors Co. – CNG day cab tractor
• Ram Commercial – CNG pickup
• ROUSH CleanTech – liquid propane autogas pickup
• Vanair Manufacturing Inc. – diesel idle management system
• VIA Motors Inc. – electric pickup
• XL Hybrids – hybrid electric cargo van
• Zenith Motors – electric cargo van

Green Truck Summit Sessions
Technical experts, government officials, business leaders and fleet managers presented a variety of technical sessions at the Green Truck Summit. Among them was “Successfully Selecting and Deploying Green Technologies – A Fleet Perspective,” during which fleet managers shared how and why they successfully chose and deployed the right sustainable technologies for their operations. In a panel presentation on “The Future of Sustainability for Work Trucks,” nine OEMs presented strategies and solutions for incorporating alternative fuels and advanced technologies into their future product offerings.

Other Green Truck Summit sessions covered:
• Work Truck Fuel and Advanced Technology Deployment and Trends
• The Vision and Reality of Natural Gas, a 100-Year Transportation Fuel
• The Successful Application of Low-Cost Strategies for Reducing Fleet Fuel Consumption
• Finishing Maintenance Training Before Your Alternative Fuel Truck Arrives
• Deploying Vehicles with Electric Drive Technology
• Choosing the Right Sustainability Technology for Your Truck’s Drive and Duty Cycles
• Idle Management Technology and Implementation Strategies for Work Trucks
• Electrification of Accessory Loads
• Financial Incentives for Alternative Fuel and Green Technology on Trucks
• Fueling a Competitive Edge: How Top Fleets are Succeeding with Propane Autogas
• Analysis of Alternative Fuels and Green Technology from a Return on Investment Perspective

Editor’s Note: Look for reports on Green Truck Summit sessions in future issues of Utility Fleet Professional. The 2015 Work Truck Show and Green Truck Summit will be held March 4-6 in Indianapolis. Visit www.ntea.com.

GREEN TECHNOLOGIES

Odyne Systems Delivers First DOE Award Truck
Odyne Systems has rolled out one of the first units deployed under a $45.4 million U.S. Department of Energy award. The money is being used to develop and deploy plug-in hybrid systems on more than 120 trucks for investor-owned utilities and municipal electric companies throughout North America.

The Odyne plug-in hybrid system interfaces with Allison Transmission’s fully automatic gearboxes and uses a Remy electric motor in parallel with the existing drivetrain to provide launch assist and regenerative braking. At the work site, the system, featuring Johnson Controls lithium-ion battery packs, powers applications with the engine off.

Odyne systems are modular and can be applied and retrofitted to a wide range of work truck chassis in various types of operations. The systems are sold through Altec, DUECO and Terex Utilities and serviced by those organizations as well as by Allison Transmission distributors. Visit www.odyne.com.

XL Hybrids Expands Powertrain Technology to Ford
The new XL3 Hybrid Electric Drive System from XL Hybrids is now available for Ford cutaway and strip chassis vehicles. The application of the hybrid electric powertrain technology to a new vehicle platform extends the company’s reach from Class 1 and 2 vans to Class 3 and 4 truck and shuttle bus configurations up to 14,500 pounds GVW.

The XL3 Hybrid Electric Drive System is a charge-sustaining powertrain that installs in five hours and does not necessitate special plugs, charging or fueling, driver training or maintenance requirements. XL Hybrids is making the technology available for Ford E-350 and E-450 cutaway models immediately, and soon will offer the system for E-350 and E-450 stripped chassis and for GMC 3500/4500 cutaway chassis. Visit www.xlhybrids.com.

eNow Announces Partnerships
A developer of solar-based auxiliary power systems for medium- and heavy-duty trucks and buses, eNow has formed a new business alliance with Velociti, a provider of technology deployment services. As a result, Velociti will be capable of installing any of eNow’s solar-powered eCharge energy systems either at a customer’s facility or at a Velociti facility.

eNow offers several solar auxiliary power systems. Its eCharge Solar Battery Charger is designed for vehicles that lose battery charge when powered off for extended periods, and for vehicles with emergency/safety lighting, liftgates or other battery-powered auxiliary systems. Recently, Palfinger added eNow’s 100-Watt eCharge Solar Battery Charger as an optional feature on all of its liftgate systems. Previously announced eNow partners include Bergstrom, Mitsubishi Fuso Truck of America, Hercules Mfg. Co. and Anthony Liftgates, and the California Air Resources Board has approved the use of eNow’s solar-powered auxiliary power system on heavy-duty diesel-fueled vehicles.

“We’re always on the lookout for technologies that our customers can leverage to maximize efficiency and value in their fleet,” said Velociti President Deryk Powell. “eNow’s solar technology is that type of value-added product. Additionally, fleets know that effective maintenance of their assets can improve productivity, efficiency and lower costs, and many fleets today are facing technician shortages. Using an expert to deploy and support transportation technologies in fleet operations means company technicians can focus on keeping today’s complex equipment operating properly.” Visit www.enowenergy.com and www.velociti.com.

Allison Launches FuelSense
Freightliner will be the first OEM in North America to release FuelSense in medium-duty trucks. The new fuel-efficiency package from Allison Transmission, the manufacturer said, has cut fuel consumption by up to 20 percent during both testing and simulations. The new features will be available in late 2014 in Freightliner M2 chassis equipped with Allison 2000 and 3000 series transmissions.

According to Lou Gilbert, Allison Transmission’s director of North American marketing and global brand development, FuelSense adapts to driving conditions using features that have a proven impact on fuel economy. In particular, FuelSense features automatically adapt shift schedules and torque based on load, grade and duty cycle.

Included in FuelSense are 5th Generation smart controls, acceleration management, an inclinometer, EcoCal shift technology designed to keep engine speed at an efficient level, Dynamic Shift Sensing to automatically sense when low-engine speed shifts can be made, and Neutral at Stop to save fuel and reduce emissions when the vehicle is stationary. Visit www.allisontransmission.com.

Video Series Documents Fleet Success with Propane Autogas
Straight Talk, a new video series from the Propane Education & Research Council, features interviews with fleet managers about their experiences using propane autogas. The goal of the series is to document topics PERC identifies as important to fleets considering a switch to alternative fuels, including return on initial investment, ease of installation and access to affordable refueling infrastructure. The series is available at www.propanestraighttalk.com.

According to PERC, propane autogas sales reached record numbers in 2013 as OEMs introduced new light- and medium-duty vehicles and added more EPA- and CARB-certified conversions. The EPA-approved alternative fuel emits 12 percent less carbon dioxide, 20 percent less nitrogen oxide, 60 percent less carbon monoxide and costs 40 to 50 percent less than gasoline. Visit www.autogasusa.org.

Powertrain Integration Showcases Propane Autogas Solutions
As Powertrain Integration celebrates 10 years of providing GM with propane autogas engine solutions, the company is highlighting its offerings of LPG engine packages, including medium-duty vehicle applications in conjunction with Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp. and CleanFUEL USA.

Displays from Powertrain Integration provide a view into its GM 6.0L LC8 propane autogas engine as well as the recently released PI-GM 8.0L LPG V8, including a cutaway of the 8.0L intake manifold that incorporates CleanFUEL USA’s latest Liquid Propane Injection system and a PI ECM with full SAE J1939 communications. The engine produces 339 horsepower at 4,100 rpm and 495 pound-feet of torque at 3,100 rpm, and is validated for up to 33,000 pounds GVWR in on-highway use. Visit www.powertrainintegration.com.

Blue Star Gas Installs Propane Fueling Sites in 10 Cities
Eleven 24-hour propane vehicle refueling stations in the Puget Sound region have been opened by Blue Star Gas, a propane fuel supplier and a member of the Alliance AutoGas clean vehicle conversion and refueling network. The refueling stations will serve more than 400 customer vehicles in the Pacific Northwest, providing customers with 24/7 access to pumps via a card-reading system, which also enables users to track fuel savings and miles-per-gallon usage.

The propane autogas refueling sites will service the Pacific Northwest’s growing population of alternative fuel vehicles, according to Darren Engle, Blue Star Gas director of government relations. “As more companies convert to alternative fuels, Blue Star Gas is providing the resources they need to make the transition easy and simple,” Engle said.

Fleets in the area can contact a local Blue Star Gas fleet specialist for access to the stations and training on safe refueling, and for more information about propane autogas and available equipment options. Visit www.bluestargas.com.

ACEEE Releases 2014 Environmental Scores
The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy has released its 17th annual environmental ratings for vehicles. “We’ve had such an influx of hybrid and electric vehicles in recent years that the race to earn a spot on the Greenest list is more competitive than ever, particularly for conventional vehicles,” said Shruti Vaidyanathan, ACEEE lead vehicle analyst. “It’s encouraging to see automakers investing heavily in eco-savvy vehicles.”

For this year, the Smart ForTwo Electric Drive topped the ACEEE Greenest list, followed closely by the Toyota Prius C and the Nissan Leaf. Toyota’s entire line of Priuses performed well in 2014 with the regular Prius and the Prius plug-in hybrid rated in spots four and seven on the list. Other top scorers included the Honda Civic Hybrid (five), Lexus CT 200h (six), Honda Insight (10) and the Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid (12), as well as the Honda Civic Natural Gas vehicle (nine). New this year is the Mitsubishi Mirage, a subcompact that took eighth place. Rounding out the top 12 spots at number 11 was the nonhybrid gasoline model Smart ForTwo.

ACEEE also identified a Greener Choices list of models, including trucks and SUVs such as the Buick Encore, Nissan Rogue and Ram 1500 HFE. On the Greenercars.org website, each vehicle is assigned a Green Score that incorporates life-cycle greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions. This year, updates to the methodology to more accurately estimate environmental impact include in-use emissions of methane and nitrous oxides, evaporative emissions estimates, and gasoline, diesel and natural gas upstream emissions.

Summary Green Scores of the more than 1,000 configurations of all model year 2014 vehicles are available to subscribers of the interactive database along with each configuration’s fuel economy, health-related pollution impacts and greenhouse gas emissions. Subscribers can also build custom lists for comparing vehicles. Visit www.aceee.org.

GREEN SHOPS

Green Fleet Issues are Driving Software Adoption
Environmental issues are becoming an ever more important motivator for adopting fleet management software, said Ron Katz, senior vice president of North American sales at Chevin Fleet Solutions. “The use of environmental reporting tools available in fleet management software is growing, especially among federal, municipal and large corporate fleets,” he added. “More and more organizations are adopting alternative fuel targets and innovative transportation initiatives as part of wider environmental policies and vehicle operations strategies in an effort to meet sustainability goals.

“We are seeing increasing numbers of clients making moves to switch from six- to four-cylinder selectors, or taking steps to ensure that bi-fuel vehicles are burning the correct fuel for the lowest possible emissions output,” Katz continued. “Some early-adopter fleets are even starting to operate electric vehicles in an effort to make their environmental impact as low as possible.”

Katz went on to explain that one of the difficulties for fleets with sustainability goals is tracking actual fuel usage in a credible way and producing compliance metrics that stand up to environmental auditing. “Producing figures that validate a fleet’s environmental performance is a complex task,” he noted. “That’s one reason why we’re seeing more interest in the alternative fuel management capabilities and environmental reporting analytics available using software that makes detailed, accurate and timely fuel usage information readily available.” Visit www.chevinfleet.com.

Demand to Soar for Eco-Friendly Vehicle Lifts
As fleet maintenance and service shops address new and more stringent environmental requirements, 2014 is shaping up to be the year of the green lift, according to Stertil-Koni USA Inc. President Dr. Jean DellAmore. “As fleets strive to contain costs, enhance efficiency and address environmental mandates, an increasing number are going green in an approach that can benefit both the environment and the bottom line,” he said. “What’s more, the opportunity to go green and reduce costs extends beyond the realm of vehicles to the equipment used to service them.”

Stertil-Koni’s market analysis shows that customers of all types and sizes will increasingly require eco-friendly vehicle lifts in 2014, including a broad array of lifting systems, DellAmore noted. In response, he added that Stertil-Koni has introduced DIAMOND LIFT, which has a total lifting capacity of up to 96,000 pounds and utilizes biodegradable oil and a design that prohibits hazardous shop fluids from entering the environment.

For in-ground lifts, Stertil-Koni has developed its ECOLIFT. With a lifting capacity of up to 90,000 pounds, the in-ground axle-engaging lift only requires 3.5 gallons of fluid per scissor, and, with nothing embedded below ground, can be used at locations with a high water table.

Additionally, Stertil-Koni recently introduced a new generation of its green hydraulic mobile column lift. EARTHLIFT, now with a lifting capacity of 18,500 pounds per column, features columns made of components that are 98 percent recyclable and the company’s Active Energy Retrieval System, which achieves 35 percent more lifting cycles at maximum lifting load.

“Our research clearly indicates that going green is the best way to serve our rapidly growing customer base and simultaneously provide sound environmental stewardship to meet the demands ahead,” DellAmore concluded. Visit www.stertil-koni.com.

Chevy-Impala1-Web

Green News

EPA 2014 Renewable Fuel Standards Proposal Reaffirms Commitment to Biofuels
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the levels of renewable fuels to be blended into gasoline and diesel. The proposal for annual volume requirements, developed with input from the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Agriculture, is required under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 for all motor vehicle gasoline and diesel produced or imported in 2014.

The EPA proposal seeks to put the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program on a path forward. The renewable fuels program was developed by Congress in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and expand the nation’s renewable fuels sector while reducing reliance on foreign oil. The standards determine how much renewable fuel a refiner or importer is responsible for, and are designed to achieve national volumes for each type of renewable fuel.

“Biofuels are a key part of the Obama administration’s ‘all of the above’ energy strategy, helping to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, cut carbon pollution and create jobs,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “We have made great progress in recent years, and EPA continues to support the RFS goal of increasing biofuel production and use. We look forward to working with all stakeholders to develop a final rule that maintains the strength and promise of the RFS program.”

The proposal discusses a variety of approaches for setting the 2014 standards, and includes a number of production and consumption ranges for key categories of biofuels covered by the RFS program. Specifically, EPA is proposing volumes for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel and renewable fuels.

EPA is also addressing the E10 blend wall issue. Nearly all gasoline sold in the U.S. is now E10, which is fuel with up to 10 percent ethanol. Production of renewable fuels has been growing rapidly in recent years. At the same time, advances in vehicle fuel economy and other economic factors have pushed gasoline consumption far lower than what was expected when Congress passed the RFS. As a result, the country is now at the E10 blend wall, the point at which the E10 fuel pool is saturated with ethanol. If gasoline demand continues to decline, as currently forecast, continuing growth in the use of ethanol will require greater use of higher ethanol blends such as E15 and E85.

The Obama administration has taken a number of steps to allow or encourage the use of these higher ethanol blends. In 2010, EPA approved E15 for use in vehicles newer than model year 2001, and developed labeling rules to enable retailers to market E15. In addition, since 2011, the USDA has made funding available through the Rural Energy for America Program to support deployment of flex-fuel pumps that can dispense a range of ethanol blends.

The new 2014 proposal seeks to address additional actions that could be taken by government and industry to help overcome current market challenges, and to minimize the need for adjustments in the statutory renewable fuel volume requirements in the future. Visit www.epa.gov/otaq/fuels/renewablefuels/regulations.htm.

HTUF Update
The 13th High-Efficiency Truck Users Forum (HTUF) National Meeting, held recently in Chicago, proved to be an important venue for bringing together stakeholders from all corners of the industry to advance the commercialization and adoption of high-efficiency truck and bus technologies. Billed as “The Forum for Action in High-Efficiency Commercial Vehicles,” HTUF focused on work across all high-efficiency technologies for commercial vehicles, and identified key actions required to move forward in the year ahead.

The HTUF Commercial Truck Action Group provided feedback on several working groups and initiatives, including strong support from across the industry for a nationwide voucher incentive expansion program. CALSTART is now in the process of developing a formal proposal for industry engagement and commitment to help implement these programs.

New companies and technologies continue to face significant structural obstacles related to emissions certification and onboard diagnostics compliance. As a result, CALSTART is continuing to explore opportunities for creating a certification process with more flexible policies that would allow new technologies to be deployed during the early (low-volume) stages of commercialization.

Sessions at HTUF focused on other issues as well. Included was a fleet deployment best practices working group session on helping fleets achieve economic and operational benefits as they deploy high-efficiency technologies. One question the session tried to help answer, for example, was, “How should our industry define, measure and prioritize high-efficiency technology deployment?”

Also at HTUF were the following sessions:
Reduced Battery Life Cycle Costs Initiative
Engineered Fuels – What are some of the more cost-effective improvements over traditional diesel and gasoline? When and where will they become more widely available to fleets?
Advanced High Power Charging Systems for Your Electric Truck or Bus – New fast-charge systems are being readied for market that have potential to significantly expand the use of EV and PHEV technologies.
Natural Gas as an Enabling Fuel for Near Zero Emissions – Several innovative applications for NG were highlighted as methods to extend the near-term range and performance capability of HD EVs.
Zero Emission Truck and Bus Breakthrough – Several recent and important developments and programs were shared regarding ZE truck and bus development and deployment.

During the HTUF meeting, a Ride & Drive event included a technology parade. Featured were vehicles that focus on progress in refining overall driveability (noise vibration and harshness), continued innovation around regenerative braking (maximizing efficiency while also accommodating driver/fleet feedback) and increased utilization of real-time driver feedback displays.

HTUF also hosted the Hino/FleetCarma MPG Challenge, which demonstrated the significance of driver behavior on fuel economy on a fixed route of approximately 1.2 miles with eight to nine stops. The tests were conducted without exceeding locally posted speed limits or violating safe driving practices. The test vehicle for the challenge was a 2014 Hino 195h hybrid electric truck provided by Hino Trucks. Since a diesel-equivalent truck was not available, baseline fuel economy results were established by driving the Hino hybrid under aggressive driving conditions.

Results of the challenge included that out of 21 drivers, three drivers demonstrated a 45 percent improvement in fuel economy (mpg) compared to the aggressive driving baseline. Filtering the data to exclude the three most efficient drivers, the results indicated that typical drivers delivered from a 15 percent to 35 percent mpg improvement, depending on driving behavior.

The results, according to HTUF organizers, clearly demonstrate the importance of driver behavior on hybrid mpg results, and reinforce the importance of driver feedback displays and driver training, a fleet deployment best practice that is receiving increased attention industry-wide.

“The High-Efficiency Truck Users Forum is a process for driving and accelerating the commercialization of high-efficiency technologies into the commercial vehicle market,” said Kevin Beaty, vice president and HTUF director, CALSTART. “We do this by using a proven, fleet-driven commercialization model and fostering a unique collaboration between OEMs, suppliers, fleets, policymakers and other stakeholders. We promote technology deployment and validation through action-oriented industry working groups aimed at achieving the goal of driving down the cost of developing new technologies.”

The 2014 HTUF Annual Meeting will be held September 22-23, 2014, at the Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Ill. Visit www.calstart.org.

GREEN VEHICLES

Club Car Launches New Line of Carryall Vehicles
To help commercial customers switch from pickup trucks to gas, diesel or zero-emissions electric utility vehicles, Club Car is launching a new line of Carryall utility and transport vehicles (UTVs). To bridge the gap between trucks and UTVs, the manufacturer partnered with Subaru to design a new 14-horsepower, 404-cc, single-cylinder overhead cam engine that features electronic fuel injection, capacitive discharge ignition, hemispherical heads and a case-hardened steel timing chain. A splash lubrication system, which eliminates the need for oil filters to simplify maintenance and reduce environmental waste, is included as well.

Most new electric Carryall utility vehicles will feature a combination of an onboard, high-frequency charger with an integrated cord retractor as standard equipment. The charger can be programmed for multiple algorithms, including lead acid or gel/AGM batteries, and can be plugged into any 110- or 240-volt outlet.

The new Carryall vehicles retain the rustproof aluminum frame, rack-and-pinion steering and independent front suspension system on previous models. An aluminum bed box accommodates a configurable and removable track-based attachment system for tools and other equipment. Movable bed dividers and cargo tie-downs to stabilize loads and prevent shifting are available, and the system accommodates optional ladder racks, bucket holders and other accessories. Visit www.clubcar.com.

Transforming Service Vans to Hybrid Vehicles
Newly purchased 2014 Chevrolet Express service vans in the Coca-Cola fleet are now fitted with hybrid electric powertrain technology from XL Hybrids. Coca-Cola, which currently operates the largest hybrid electric delivery fleet in North America, is adding 100 of the vans to its light-duty fleet.

The XL Hybrids patent-pending hybrid electric powertrain can be installed on existing or new vehicles. Early test results of the technology at Coca-Cola showed a 15 to 20 percent reduction in fuel use compared to conventional vans. The company estimates that as a result of fuel savings, the powertrain unit will pay for itself three times over its projected 10-year life span. Visit www.xlhybrids.com.

GM to Offer Full-Size Bi-Fuel Sedan
A Chevrolet Impala sedan that operates on either gasoline or compressed natural gas (CNG) will be available to fleet customers from General Motors. The GM-produced full-size bi-fuel sedan is expected to go on sale next summer as a 2015 model.

The Chevrolet Impala bi-fuel sedan, according to the manufacturer, is designed to address the range anxiety associated with vehicles that run only on natural gas. The model features a factory-engineered powertrain that switches seamlessly from CNG to gasoline. Total range is expected to be up to 500 miles.

Other GM green initiatives, in addition to the Chevrolet Volt, Chevrolet Spark EV and the upcoming Cadillac ELR, include the introduction of start-stop technology as standard on the 2014 Chevrolet Malibu, helping the midsize sedan achieve a 25 mpg city/36 mpg highway rating. GM is also using electrification to boost fuel economy in the Buick Regal and LaCrosse sedans, which both get an EPA-estimated 36 mpg in highway use. Visit www.gmfleet.com.

First CNG-Capable 2014 Ford F-150 Rolls Off the Line
Ford has begun production of the 2014 F-150 half-ton pickup with the ability to run on natural gas. The vehicle, powered by a 3.7-liter V-6 engine, is available with a factory-installed, gaseous-fuel prep package that includes hardened valves, valve seats, and pistons and rings, so it can operate on either natural gas or gasoline through separate fuel systems. When equipped with a bi-fuel CNG/LPG engine package, the F-150 is capable of achieving more than 750 miles on combined tanks of gasoline and CNG, depending on tank sizes.

For the CNG/LPG models, fleets choose a Ford Qualified Vehicle Modifier to supply fuel tanks, fuel lines and unique fuel injectors. The OEM has established a rigorous qualification program for alternative-fuel vehicle modifiers.

By next summer, Ford will offer eight commercial vehicles with a gaseous-prep option, including:
• Transit Connect van and wagon
• Transit van, wagon, cutaway and chassis cab
• E-Series van, wagon, cutaway and stripped chassis
• F-Series Super Duty pickup and F-350 chassis cab
• F-Series Super Duty chassis cab (F-450, F-550)
• F-650 medium-duty truck
• F-53 and F-59 stripped chassis
• 2014 F-150 light-duty pickup

Ford notes that customers also can accelerate the payback period in a bi-fuel vehicle by taking advantage of a growing number of state incentives. Nearly 20 states offer or will soon provide tax incentives or rebates for CNG-converted vehicles. Visit www.fleet.ford.com.

UPCOMING GREEN EVENTS

The Green Truck Summit & The Work Truck Show 2014
March 4-7
Indianapolis
www.ntea.com

The Green Truck Summit, to be held March 4-5, 2014, in conjunction with The Work Truck Show 2014, offers an opportunity to gather information about innovative clean vehicle technologies, alternative fuel trends and upcoming products. Produced by the NTEA and presented by International Truck, the 2014 Green Truck Summit will focus on the rising use of natural gas to power vocational trucks.

Technical experts, government officials, business leaders, and early adopter fleet managers will present educational sessions at the Green Truck Summit, including five general and 24 breakout sessions on a variety of topics, including:
• Advanced technology trends
• Ways to reduce fuel consumption
• Technology selection and deployment strategies
• Funding opportunities and incentives
• Critical advances in engine and fuel technology
• Implementation challenges
• Determining return on investment
• OEM strategies for incorporating advanced technologies into future product offerings

AltCar Expo
March 14-15
Richmond, Calif.
www.altcarexponorcal.com

A forum for green vehicle ride and drive demonstrations of the latest advancements in alternative technology vehicles, urban planning, energy efficiency and climate education, the new Northern California AltCar Expo will include an Industry/Fleet Day. The expo will include electric, hybrid electric, natural gas and hydrogen vehicles, and feature a number of debuts.

The Northern California AltCar Expo event will also be the site of presentations by experts in clean driving technology, and will provide an opportunity to learn more about a newly announced plan backed by governors of eight states to put 3.3 million zero-emission vehicles on the road within a dozen years. The plan calls for the creation of financial incentive programs, development of a common standard for roadway signs and charging networks, and the possibility of establishing favorable electricity rates for home charging.

Northeast Regional HTUF Fleet Workshop and Ride and Drive
April 16
New York
www.calstart.org

In partnership with the City of New York, the Northeast Regional HTUF Fleet Workshop and Ride and Drive will provide a full day of activities focused on advancing alternative fuel vehicles in the Northeast through best business practices. Fleets throughout the region are invited to participate in an engaging discussion focused on region-specific business needs, appropriate technology solutions by fleet vocation and incentives available in New York to help drive the alternative fuel vehicle market. Following the morning panel discussions, fleets and regional stakeholders will have the opportunity to get behind the wheel of an alternative fuel vehicle and experience the efficiencies and benefits of cleaner, more sustainable vehicle solutions.

Alternative Clean Transportation Expo 2014
May 5-8
Long Beach, Calif.
www.actexpo.com

The ACT Expo brings together more than 3,000 fleet, technology company, OEM, fuel provider, infrastructure developer and policymaker attendees. All weight classes and alternative fuel types are represented at the event, including electric, hybrid, hydrogen, natural gas, propane autogas and renewable fuels. Participants can explore the event’s expo hall and test-drive dozens of advanced technology vehicles, see alternative fuel vehicle projects at off-site tours, attend fleet-focused educational sessions, and network with vehicle, fueling and technology suppliers.

Electric Drive Transportation Association Conference & Annual Meeting
May 19-21
Indianapolis
www.edta2014.com

The EDTA promotes battery, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell electric drive technologies and infrastructure. The EDTA also conducts public policy advocacy, education, industry networking and conferences. Its membership includes vehicle and equipment manufacturers, energy companies, technology developers, component suppliers, government agencies and others.

Green-Fleets-ePTO-Odyne-Web

Green News

CALSTART and its industry partners have helped pass legislation in California aimed at enhancing short- and long-term funding for clean trucks, buses and cars. These measures that are expected to have a nationwide impact include:
• Assembly Bill (AB) 8 that will extend and expand funding for advanced vehicle and fuel demonstrations and deployments through 2023, for a total of more than $2 billion. The funds will continue and enhance funding of the current AB 118 program demonstration and incentive projects, including the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP).
• Senate bills 95 and 359, which fill a funding gap in the HVIP voucher program for hybrid and electric trucks and buses, and rebates for clean passenger cars for 2014.
Visit www.calstart.org.

Dalum Named to EDTA Board
Joe Dalum, president and CEO of Odyne Systems, a manufacturer of hybrid systems for medium- and heavy-duty trucks, has been appointed to the board of the Electric Drive Transportation Association. EDTA works with policymakers and the public to advance electric drive transportation.

“I look forward to serving on the board of directors of the Electric Drive Transportation Association during this time of accelerated industry growth and rapid advancements in technology,” Dalum said. “Greater electrification of vehicle systems can help the country meet energy security and environmental goals, while providing operational savings and benefits.”

Dalum also currently serves as president of the Green Truck Association, an affiliate of NTEA. Prior to founding Odyne Systems in 2009, he worked for DUECO, a final-stage manufacturer of medium- and heavy-duty trucks, as engineering manager, vice president and executive vice president. Visit www.electricdrive.org and www.odyne.com.

Electric PTO: The Technology and How It Performs
Presentations on electric PTO technologies from the 2013 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference

Mark Greer, Green Fleet market manager at Altec Industries, said that development of the company’s Jobsite Energy Management System (JEMS) was based on looking at all the reasons why the truck engine runs at job sites, including the need to power the boom and provide power for tools, cab comfort and lighting. “The idea was to electrify these loads when at the job site with a system that is sized for the aerial device, accounts for work practices and considers payload requirements,” he related. Greer went on to list the benefits of ePTO technology like JEMS. Included were reduced fuel consumption, lower tailpipe emissions, less idle time at the job site, reduced operating noise, and crew safety and health.

Matt Jarmuz, director of sales at Odyne Systems, noted that trucks more than 14,000 pounds GVW can save 50 percent or more in fuel (more than 1,000 gallons annually), depending on the duty cycle, with a plug-in hybrid propulsion system. The technology, he reported, saves fuel during drive cycles and during stationary operations at work sites.

Odyne’s hybrid architecture, which incorporates Allison automatic transmissions, Johnson Controls lithium-ion batteries and Remy electric motors, is a parallel hybrid solution that can be retrofitted to existing vehicles and installed without the need to modify the OEM drivetrain.

Odyne systems are installed by the company and shipped to final stage manufacturers such as Altec, DUECO, Terex and Utilimaster. Initial market applications for the solution include aerial devices, cranes, digger derricks, and vehicles used for construction and maintenance of underground utilities.

It’s important to understand your application, Jarmuz related. Data acquisition systems can track miles driven per day, kinetic intensity of driving cycle, idle and PTO time, and available time to recharge. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided data for a Hybrid Truck Payback Calculator that took into account fuel use and power requirements. Findings included that on average, vehicles are spending more than 90 percent of their time at zero speed, five hours per day in PTO mode and over an average daily distance of 12 miles, a majority were at speeds between 25 and 35 mph.

Plug-in hybrids, Jarmuz concluded, can decrease fuel consumption during driving and at job sites, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. They also are quieter, produce engine maintenance cost savings, provide more power for acceleration and truck-mounted equipment, require a minimal change in operator behavior and their less intrusive design can preserve the OEM chassis warranty.

Nick Cammisa, sales manager, HyPower Products at Terex, provided an overview of the company’s HyPower plug-in hybrid system. Used for boom and tool functions, he noted, the vehicle will operate with the engine off most of the day and the truck will auto-restart if the batteries require a charge. HyPower, which can be retrofitted to existing vehicles depending on body layout, also can provide cabin comfort and exportable power.

Lessons learned for users of earlier-generation HyPower systems are being addressed, Cammisa added. Included are continued exploration of alternative battery technologies and software improvements.

Nina Kisch, manager of transportation services at Pacific Gas and Electric, offered a fleet’s perspective with a presentation titled “PG&E’s ePTO Experience: The Ups and Downs of Electric Worksite Idle Management Systems.” With more than 3,300 on-road alternative-fueled and high-efficiency vehicles, including 349 ePTO units, PG&E is ranked among the top utility fleet users of alternative fuel vehicles.

PG&E’s ePTO vehicle strategy includes trouble trucks with 35-foot aerials. These vehicles have standard specifications and are being ordered with ePTO technology. The fleet also has ordered 55 material handlers with 55-foot booms with ePTO systems that it is considering making a standard specification.

PG&E is measuring hard benefits of plug-in hybrids like fuel costs. Using idle time, fuel use, three-year average fuel price projections, workdays per year, idling fuel cost per year and the price of the system to determine a payback period from fuel savings, Kisch reported, based on the amount of idle time, the payback period can be as short as a little more than two years. Another hard benefit being measured is engine wear, with an estimated reduction in idle time of five hours per day equating to an annual drop in engine wear of 69 percent.

Kisch also outlined soft benefits that can be realized from ePTO use. Those include cleaner air at job sites from reduced emissions, quieter operation, which facilitates safety by improving crew communication and makes utility vehicles less intrusive in neighborhoods, and the ability to extend workdays in cities with noise ordinances.

Challenges are being addressed at PG&E as well, including fostering greater operator acceptance through communication and training, infrastructure needs for charging the battery when trouble trucks go home with employees – addressed by a union agreement to reimburse employees for charging costs – and engineering issues to provide more charge to the battery when driving.

PG&E’s next steps are to integrate its new material handlers into the fleet and obtain performance results, install additional charge points, test an under-hood generator to provide more charge to the batteries when trucks can’t be plugged in regularly, look at transitioning to lithium-ion chemistry and lighter-weight batteries, and continually evaluate next-generation improvements with suppliers. Visit www.eufmc.com.

HYBRIDS

Odyne Systems Showcases Hybrid Power Truck System
Selected for nationwide deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy is a hybrid propulsion system from Odyne Systems. The company was chosen to participate in a $45.4 million award to develop and deploy more than 120 plug-in hybrid systems for trucks throughout North America.

The Odyne plug-in hybrid system on display at ICUEE – held in October at Louisville’s Kentucky Exposition Center – on an International chassis is designed to interface with truck-mounted equipment. According to the company, the system reduces fuel consumption by up to 50 percent, depending on application, and increases power. The Odyne solution uses a Remy electric motor in parallel with the existing drivetrain, and Johnson Controls lithium-ion battery packs, to provide launch assist and regenerative braking and to provide power at the job site.

“We are excited to be introducing several recent developments that are continually advancing hybrid and truck electrification technology,” said Joe Dalum, president of Odyne Systems. “The market is embracing our ePTO functionality and enhanced transmission interface, developed in coordination with Allison Transmission, our investment partner. We look forward to further optimization of the hybrid drivetrain and continued gains in efficiency through additional engineering collaboration with Allison.” Visit www.odyne.com and www.allisontransmission.com.

PG&E Joins with EVI to Unveil Hybrid Electric Bucket Trucks
Class 5 extended-range hybrid electric trucks, capable of providing power to homes and businesses during outages, have been introduced by Electric Vehicles International and Pacific Gas and Electric. The Range Extended Electric Vehicle (REEV) utility trucks, developed by EVI in partnership with PG&E and the California Energy Commission, were designed, built and tested at EVI’s manufacturing plant in Stockton, Calif.

REEV features an all-electric range of 45 miles and fuel savings of up to 30 percent when the units are operating in hybrid mode, the manufacturer noted. PG&E accepted delivery of the first two REEV units this summer, and purchased two additional units after a successful initial demonstration of the vehicles.

PG&E plans to eventually replace all 942 of its conventional fuel Class 5 vehicles, including bucket trucks, flatbeds and other service trucks, with plug-in electric hybrid models, which would save the utility nearly $3.5 million in fuel costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 9,000 metric tons annually. In addition to the fuel savings and environmental benefits that PG&E anticipates as it deploys these trucks in increasing numbers, the trucks also offer up to 75 kW of exportable power that could be used to provide power to the grid during planned or unplanned outages.

“These trucks not only will help us reduce our fuel costs as well as our carbon footprint, but in the event of an outage, we would be able to use their exportable power capacity to supply electricity to homes and businesses,” said Dave Meisel, senior director of transportation and aviation services for PG&E. “For us, as a utility, that is a game changer for the future.” Visit www.evi-usa.com and www.pge.com.

NATURAL GAS

Chevrolet and GMC Expand Bi-Fuel Truck and Van Offerings
2014 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD and GMC Sierra 2500HD bi-fuel pickup trucks are now available in a crew cab configuration. The bi-fuel pickups run on gasoline or compressed natural gas (CNG) and seamlessly switch between the two fuels for a combined range of 650 miles. They are available in standard and long-box and two- or four-wheel-drive models.

In 2015, model year 2014 GMC Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado trucks and Chevrolet Express and GMC Savana full-size passenger vans will be available in dedicated CNG versions. The Express and Savana passenger vans join a dedicated CNG lineup that includes cargo versions of the vehicles.

“With these new vehicles, General Motors offers the most comprehensive lineup of manufacturer-engineered, validated and warranted CNG vehicles, helping fleet managers manage their budget and reduce their carbon footprint,” said Ed Peper, U.S. vice president, GM Fleet and Commercial Sales. “Natural gas is less costly at the pump and significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions compared to other liquid fuels.”

Using both fuels, the GM and Chevy trucks have an approximate total driving range of 650 miles. The vans are built with a gaseous fuel-ready 6.0-liter V-8 and equipped with dedicated CNG fuel systems, available in three- or four-tank models on cargo vans and exclusively with the three-tank design on the passenger van models. The new CNG passenger vans offer an approximately 200-mile driving range in three-tank versions. With the four-tank configuration, the range on the cargo vans extends to approximately 300 miles. Visit www.gmfleet.com.

American Trucking Associations Partners with NGVAmerica
The American Trucking Associations has become an event partner of NGVAmerica’s 2013 North American NGV Conference & Expo, which took place November 18-21 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. Themed “Natural Gas: Transportation Fuel for a Better Bottom Line,” the event, which focused on the NGV market, included three days of sessions, a 75,000-square-foot exposition, a ride-and-drive event, preconference site tours, presentation of annual NGV Achievement Awards and related industry meetings.

As an event partner, ATA provided input to NGVAmerica concerning program content, promoting the event to its membership and participating in the program, including a keynote address by ATA president and CEO Bill Graves. “There has been a great deal of interest in how America’s trucking industry can best utilize natural gas,” Graves said. “By partnering with NGVAmerica, ATA hopes to foster continued dialogue on how this fuel can benefit fleets and the environment.” Visit www.ngvamerica.org.

Bus Fleets Get Propane Autogas Green Award
The Propane Education & Research Council has recognized five public transportation fleets for their use of domestic propane autogas. Fueling with propane autogas, according to PERC, results in an estimated 40 percent reduction in smog-producing hydrocarbon emissions in light-duty vehicles compared with gasoline, and an 80 percent reduction in heavy-duty vehicles compared with diesel.

The five fleets chosen to receive a Top User of Clean-Burning Propane Autogas award were:
• Flint MTA in Flint, Mich., which operates 72 Roush CleanTech propane autogas-fueled shuttle buses. Each bus displaces an estimated 200,000 pounds of carbon dioxide during its lifetime.
• Greater Cleveland RTA in Ohio operates 20 paratransit shuttle buses fueled by propane autogas and plans to add 40 more by 2015. The buses, which replace aging diesel vehicles, are reducing Cuyahoga County’s carbon footprint by 60 percent.
• Metro Cars in Detroit displaces more than 520,000 gallons of petroleum each year and operates more than 200 propane autogas-fueled vehicles, including 13 transit buses converted by ICOM.
• Port Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio, displaces 2.5 tons of particulate matter, 11 tons of nitrogen oxide and almost 9 tons of carbon dioxide each year fueling with propane autogas. The airport operates 19 propane autogas shuttle buses with plans to convert its remaining six diesel buses.
• Unified Government of Wyandotte County near Kansas City, Kan., operates 15 propane autogas vehicles, including 13 transit buses. The county saves approximately $100,000 in annual fuel costs and displaces more than 50,000 gallons of gasoline annually.

“Propane autogas is a proven fuel that reduces emissions and delivers fuel savings,” said Tucker Perkins, PERC chief business development officer. “Our inaugural award winners are models in the public transportation sector of how propane autogas is improving the economic and environmental well-being of citizens and communities nationwide.” Visit www.autogasusa.org.

GE’s CNG In A Box Chosen for Canadian Natural Gas Fueling Stations
To help meet the needs of fleets, Chelsea Natural Gas Limited has purchased 20 GE Oil & Gas CNG In A Box fueling systems. As part of the Canadian energy company’s efforts to develop a natural gas fueling infrastructure, the company plans to use the CNG fueling stations in a semiprivate “card lock” format for shared fueling stations. The first fueling station is scheduled to open next spring.

“In Canada, where commercial fleets are smaller, it is hard for individual fleet operators to justify the expense of building their own natural gas refueling facilities,” said Steve Carmichael, CEO of Chelsea Natural Gas. “GE’s CNG In A Box solution allows us to offer a cost-effective way for fleets to take advantage of the economic and environmental benefits that come with using natural gas as a transportation fuel.”

GE’s CNG In A Box solution is a fully integrated, modular natural gas production system for fleet and retail fueling stations. For Chelsea Natural Gas, several of the CNG In A Box units will feature a cold-weather design. The solution also has payment-enabled fueling dispensers. Visit www.ge.com.

NGVi Launches Heavy-Duty and Light-Duty NGV Maintenance and Diagnostics Training Courses
The Natural Gas Vehicle Institute is offering NGV Maintenance and Diagnostics Training: Heavy-Duty Vehicles and NGV Maintenance and Diagnostics Training: Light-Duty Vehicles courses to help prepare technicians to perform maintenance, diagnostics and repair of natural gas vehicles (NGV). Both courses include operational theory with hands-on exercises and use of digital multimeters, scan tools and other diagnostic equipment, and prepare technicians for the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) H1 and F1 exams.

NGV Maintenance and Diagnostics Training: Heavy-Duty Vehicles covers all natural gas heavy-duty manufacturers’ systems, including CNG and LNG, with major emphasis on Cummins ISL G-equipped vehicles. NGV Maintenance and Diagnostics Training: Light-Duty Vehicles covers multiple natural gas light- and medium-duty manufacturers’ systems, including Altech-Eco, BAF, Honda, IMPCO, Landi Renzo, Dodge Ram and Westport LD.

NGVi plans to offer at least 12 of these courses in 2014. In-house training is available for companies that need to train 15 or more technicians.

“Both courses were designed according to the stringent requirements for ASE Continuing Automotive Service Education accreditation,” noted Annalloyd Thomason, vice president and general manager at NGVi. “Each course went through a rigorous beta test with technicians representing companies the caliber of Agility Fuel Systems, Encana, FedEx Freight, Frito-Lay/PepsiCo, Landi Renzo and Waste Management.” Visit www.ngvi.com.

FUEL CELL

FTA Announces $7.7 Million Award to CALSTART to Improve Fuel Cell Bus Technologies
In early September, the Federal Transit Administration announced awards totaling nearly $8 million to CALSTART for four separate projects that are aimed at making zero-emission, low-carbon fuel cell buses more affordable and competitive with diesel buses.

CALSTART has partnered with the FTA since the formation of the National Fuel Cell Bus Program in 2006. Over the period of the program, fuel cell lifetimes in transit operations have more than doubled while costs have declined by 50 percent.

The FTA awards to CALSTART include:
• American Fuel Cell Bus: $2,732,147 to build a next-generation fuel cell bus with the latest fuel cell technology and demonstrate in transit service in the greater Cleveland area for two years. This project builds on the success of the American Fuel Cell Bus project, funded under the National Fuel Cell Bus Program. Project partners and suppliers are Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority, Cleveland; ElDorado National, Riverside, Calif.; BAE Systems, Endicott, N.Y.; and Ballard Power Systems, Lowell, Mass.
• Battery-Dominant Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus: $4,251,307 to develop and demonstrate a battery-dominant fuel cell bus based on a commercial hybrid platform, and smaller, less expensive fuel cells. The bus will operate in similar service to the American Fuel Cell Bus, allowing direct comparison. Project partners and suppliers are SunLine Transit Agency, Thousand Palms, Calif.; ElDorado National, Riverside, Calif.; and BAE Systems, Endicott, N.Y.
• Fuel Cell Bus Altoona Testing: $554,316 for testing of an existing fuel cell bus, essential for commercialization of fuel cell electric buses. This project will help develop consistent procedures and guidelines for testing all fuel cell buses. The project partner is National Bus Testing Facility, Altoona, Pa.
• Best Practices in Hydrogen Fueling and Maintenance Facilities: $189,999 to develop a best practices guide for transit agencies in hydrogen fueling and maintenance facilities.
Visit www.calstart.org.

US Hybrid to Build Next-Generation Fuel Cell for Transit Buses
US Hybrid has been awarded a contract to build the next generation of fuel cells for transit buses. The project administered by CALSTART will be funded by the Federal Transit Administration.

US Hybrid is taking over contracts that had been previously awarded to UTC Corp., which sold its fuel cell technology and business in late 2012. US Hybrid, with experience in system design, integration and operation of fuel cell shuttle buses, specialty vehicles, passenger cars and supporting fuel cells with component electronics, will complete the fuel cell power plant development, fabrication and validation at a South Windsor, Conn., facility. Visit www.ushybrid.com.

GREEN EVENTS

Green Truck Summit & The Work Truck Show 2014
March 4-7, 2014
Indianapolis
www.ntea.com

PGE3-Web

Green News

Bills Aim to Equalize LNG Fuel Tax
The LNG Excise Tax Equalization Act of 2013 introduced in the U.S. Senate seeks to equitably tax liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a transportation fuel. Similar legislation has also been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Both bills seek to modify the way LNG is taxed as a transportation fuel. Currently, the federal highway excise tax on both diesel and LNG is set at 24.3 cents per gallon. However, it takes about 1.7 gallons of LNG to equal the energy content of 1 gallon of diesel, resulting in a tax rate that is 70 percent higher than diesel on an energy equivalent basis.

The proposed legislation changes the way LNG is taxed from a volume (gallon) to an energy content (diesel gallon equivalent) basis. This effort by Congress mirrors bills in six states where legislatures have adjusted the state tax on LNG so it is based on an energy equivalent basis.

CALSTART to Test Advanced Battery Technology in Commercial Trucks
Tests to integrate military starter batteries in commercial trucks could yield more efficient, cost-effective power for both military and commercial applications. For that reason, the U.S. Army has awarded CALSTART a contract to test 12-volt lithium-ion batteries in commercial trucks. The evaluations of three different lithium-ion chemistries will assess if the batteries can deliver performance and reliability in commercial trucks.

“Lithium-ion battery technologies promise to hold out better in the field,” said CALSTART president and CEO John Boesel. “In its own testing, the military has found that lithium batteries last longer, resulting in fewer replacements and less need for inventory. If these field tests prove successful, the commercial trucking industry may make the switch to lithium starter batteries.”

The three battery companies participating in the test are Navitas Systems (www.navitassys.com), EaglePicher Technologies (www.eaglepicher.com) and Saft (www.saftbatteries.com). Visit www.calstart.org.

PG&E Displays Green Fleet
Pacific Gas and Electric Co., which operates more than 3,400 electric or alternative fuel vehicles, showcased its range of Green Fleet vehicles on San Francisco’s Justin Herman Plaza during the Plug-In Electric Vehicle Collaborative Conference. On display were:
• Altec bucket truck and material handler that utilizes a plug-in battery-powered system called the Electric Worksite Idle Management System to power auxiliary features at job sites, including lights, hydraulic lifts and tools.
• VIA Motors extended-range electric pickup truck developed in partnership with the manufacturer. The pickup features an electric-only range of 40 miles and exportable power, which can be used to provide power during outages or to power tools used by crews in the field.
• Smith all-electric service truck, an all-electric-powered medium-duty flatbed truck developed in partnership with the manufacturer and American Truck & Trailer Body Co.
• Chevrolet Volt, Ford C-MAX Energi and Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric cars.

Also on display was a mobile command vehicle designed to support up to 15 people for long-term deployments during emergency situations. The vehicle is outfitted with a generator, workstations, laptops, satellite phones, radios and a radio controller that permits integrated communication with other emergency agencies.

HYBRIDS

Odyne Systems Wins Contract for Deployment of Plug-In Hybrid Medium- and Heavy-Duty Trucks
A U.S. Department of Energy grant to develop and deploy plug-in hybrid systems for trucks has been awarded to Odyne Systems. The contract granted to Odyne by the Electric Power Research Institute directs funding from the Department of Energy’s Transportation Electrification Initiative, the South Coast Air Quality Management District of California, and other parties for the development and supply of advanced plug-in hybrid and smart grid/smart charging technology for trucks over 14,000 pounds GVW.

It is anticipated that more than 120 Odyne plug-in hybrid systems will be installed on vehicles for partners in the program, including investor-owned utilities and municipal electric companies. Odyne’s plug-in hybrid technology combines electric power conversion, power control and energy management systems with Allison Transmission commercial vehicle transmissions. The system features a Remy HVH250 series electric motor and Johnson Controls’ modular lithium-ion battery systems.

“This contract is very significant and will put the advantages of hybrid systems for large trucks to work in communities throughout the country,” said Joe Dalum, president of Odyne Systems.
Visit www.odyne.com, www.allisontransmission.com and www.epri.com.

PG&E, Allison Transmission and Peterbilt Motors Showcase Hybrid Material Handler
Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Allison Transmission and Peterbilt Motors premiered the first utility material-handler truck equipped with the new Allison hybrid H 3000 system for commercial trucks at the Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference.

The H 3000 features parallel hybrid architecture that supplies blended power from a conventional diesel engine with an Allison automatic transmission, an electric motor with a regenerative braking kinetic energy recovery system and stored energy from batteries.

Fuel savings from the propulsion package are projected to be up to 25 percent depending on vocation and duty cycle. PG&E operates 412 material handlers, and with an anticipated fuel savings of 25 percent, the company would save 139,279 gallons per year with this technology. Visit www.allisontransmission.com and www.peterbilt.com.

Inventev Reaches National Cleantech Open Semifinals
Participating in the Cleantech Open national business competition, Inventev has been named a semifinalist from the Midwest region. The company is the developer of a plug-in hybrid electric truck propulsion system that provides power on job sites and for disaster response with mobile temporary power generation.

“We plan to integrate neighborhood generating capacity onto fleets of hybrid electric trucks, saving fuel while also having standby generating capability when needed,” said Inventev CEO Dave Stenson. “By using the same motor that will electrically drive the truck to generate utility-grade power when stationary, the Inventev system becomes very capital-efficient versus trailer-mounted generators.”

Inventev has been working with NextEnergy, a Detroit nonprofit with expertise in accelerating advanced energy-based technologies. The Cleantech Open competition will conclude regionally in October with finalists competing for national awards in November in San Jose, Calif. Visit www.inventev.com and www.cleantechopen.org.

Cowlitz PUD Gives High Marks to the Terex HyPower Hybrid System
Terex recently followed up with Cowlitz PUD to get feedback on the utility’s experience using its HyPower hybrid system, which was retrofitted onto one of the company’s existing work trucks.

“It’s quiet and we can talk to each other without yelling above the noise of the truck engine,” said Jim Cantrell, Cowlitz PUD substation wireman.

As long as the HyPower system’s rechargeable batteries are properly charged the night before, the crew can typically work a whole day on the job site without running the truck’s engine. “This is ideal for substation work where we are parked in one position all day,” Cantrell noted.

Cowlitz PUD substation wireman Todd Richardson said he’s impressed with the smooth operation of the bucket. According to Terex, the operation is not at all affected when choosing to run in regular or hybrid mode. The power is the same, the speed is the same, and when transitioning from engine on to hybrid mode while operating the boom, the transition is seamless.

“We chose the hybrid system HyPower retrofit because we had the standard manlift already, but wanted to take advantage of the benefits of a HyPower retrofit,” Cowlitz PUD said. “Benefits for us are a better work environment for employees, less need for managing the regenerative system on the truck and less carbon emissions into the atmosphere.” Visit www.terexhypower.com.

NATURAL GAS

Greenkraft Earns EPA-CARB Certification
A manufacturer and distributor of alternative fuel commercial vehicle products, Greenkraft has received U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board certification for its Ford 6.8-liter V-10 three-valve engine. The completely tested CNG fuel delivery system, according to Frank Ziegler, director of sales at Greenkraft, adds the fewest number of components to the Ford 6.8-liter three-valve engine.

Greenkraft is also offering CNG Type 4, 32.5-GGE tanks or CNG Type 4, 65-GGE packages that can be side-frame or behind-the-cabin mounted. The company is also in the process of certifying several Ford engine families and offers CNG fuel delivery systems on GM 4.8-liter and 6-liter engines. Visit www.greenkraftinc.com.

DIRECTV to Increase Propane Autogas Fleet
Plans to expand its propane autogas-fueled fleet of 77 ROUSH CleanTech Ford E-250 vans over the next year have been announced by DIRECTV, a provider of digital television entertainment services. After comparing alternative fuel options, DIRECTV chose propane autogas due to its low cost and accessibility of fuel, return on investment and domestic fuel source.

“The addition of more propane autogas-fueled vehicles to the DIRECTV fleet strengthens our commitment to reducing the company’s overall gasoline usage,” said Brandon Morris, director of fleet services for DIRECTV. “We have learned a lot from analyzing our current propane fleet, and are seeing benefits from using propane as an alternative to gasoline. Since November 2011, we have reduced gasoline consumption by 75,000 gallons and saved nearly 50 percent on a cost-per-gallon basis compared to gasoline.”

ROUSH CleanTech designs, engineers, manufactures, and installs propane autogas fuel system technology for light- and medium-duty Ford commercial vehicles, and Type A and Type C Blue Bird school buses. Visit www.roushcleantech.com.

Virginia Clean Cities Reaches 1,000 Vehicle Conversions to Propane
The largest propane deployment project in the U.S. involving a government partnership, Virginia Clean Cities has now converted 1,000 vehicles through the Southeast Propane Autogas Development Program. The program is supported by funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Program.

The vehicle conversions in this program take gasoline-powered vehicles and upfit them with the bi-fuel Prins VSI propane autogas system. Visit www.usepropaneautogas.com and www.vacleancities.org.

Alliance AutoGas Installs 600th Propane Refueling Station
As of June, Alliance AutoGas had installed its 600th propane autogas refueling station at a fleet facility. The company usually supplies its refueling technology at no upfront cost and then provides customers with autogas, vehicle conversions, and ongoing training and technical support. For fleets interested in new propane autogas-powered vehicles, Alliance provides vehicles from U.S. manufacturers, and is the exclusive U.S. distributor of Prins autogas systems. Visit www.allianceautogas.com.

Quantum Develops Lightweight Carbon Composite CNG Fuel Tanks
Utilizing selective fiber placement that leads to a reduction in weight, Quantum, under sponsorship by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy, has developed lightweight composite shells for natural gas storage tanks. Under a patent filing, the company has demonstrated more than a 20 percent reduction in material needed for its lightweight carbon composite compressed natural gas fuel tanks.

“This is a significant patent in that it provides a solution to reduce both weight and cost of fuel tanks, enabling more widespread commercialization of natural gas vehicles,” said Brian Olson, president and CEO of Quantum. “We are in the process of refining this technology for phased introduction into commercial products.” Visit www.qtww.com.

ELECTRIC

Energy Xtreme partners with City of Austin Public Works Department
Field data on Energy Xtreme’s Independence Package (IP) Utility Service Vehicle Series smart power management systems is revealing savings for the City of Austin. The public works department has utilized 31 IP4 models of the auxiliary power unit in its fleet for the past three years.

The Austin Public Works Department used the IP4 four hours per day to eliminate four hours of idling and realized an estimated savings of 4.8 gallons of gasoline per day, elimination of an estimated 140 idling miles per day and a reduction in costs for battery replacement.

The IP4, with a 4,000-Whr capacity, provides AC power for tools and has a built-in inverter allowing for shore power to operate a utility truck’s full electrical load – including beacon lights, camera, radio, computer and power tools – without engaging the engine. Visit www.energyxtreme.net.

Stockton to Deploy Battery-Electric Transit Buses
In a program managed by CALSTART, the California Energy Commission is providing funding for two electric buses operated by the San Joaquin Regional Transit District. Built by Proterra, the battery-electric transit buses, which have all the functionality of a conventional transit bus, will operate throughout an entire daily cycle, recharging using a fully automated rapid charging system for 10 minutes every two hours. When the bus approaches the charge station, the station recognizes the bus, guides the bus into position and charges the vehicle without driver interaction. Visit www.calstart.org.

Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services Showcase Fast-Charge Solution
A bidirectional DC fast-charging system using vehicle-to-grid technology has been demonstrated by Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services. The turnkey solution utilizes Boulder Electric Vehicle’s all-electric truck equipped with a lithium 72-kWh battery pack and a Coritech 60-kW DC fast-charger system. Boulder Electric Vehicle offers a range of electric vehicles. Coritech Services offers DC fast chargers capable of bidirectional charging and discharging. Visit www.boulderev.com.

GREEN EVENTS

HTUF 2013 National Meeting
October 7-9
Chicago
www.calstart.org

2013 North American Natural Gas Vehicle Conference & Expo
November 18-21
Atlanta
www.cleanvehicle.org

The Work Truck Show 2014
March 5-7
Green Truck Summit begins March 4
Indianapolis
www.ntea.com

Green News

Purchasing fuel-efficient technology may be one of the best options utility fleets have to reduce costs. Now, significant and easily accessible funding is becoming more readily available.

In California, one program that is proving highly beneficial is the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP). Similar programs may also be coming soon to other parts of the country, including New York state and the city of Chicago, among others.

Now in its third year, HVIP is administered and implemented through a partnership between the California Air Resources Board and CALSTART, the clean transportation technology and fuels consortium. To date, more than $28 million has been delivered through the program, and 1,200+ hybrid and electric vehicles have been delivered. Additional funding is available to both public and private utility and telecom companies.

HVIP is designed to offset about half of the additional cost of eligible vehicles, including hybrid, battery-electric, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for medium- and heavy-duty trucks and buses. Vouchers range from $8,000 to $55,000 per vehicle depending on the vehicle size and model and the total number of vehicles purchased. Approved voucher amounts are deducted at the time of purchase.

Vehicles that are outfitted with hybrid aerial boom lifts, such as the Altec JEMS, are eligible for funding even if the lifts are installed on a vehicle without a hybrid driveline. Other manufacturers with eligible hybrid vehicles include Freightliner, Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., Peterbilt, Kenworth, Hino, Altec, Autocar and Thomas Built. Current electric vehicle offerings include Smith Electric, Electric Vehicles International and Boulder Electric.

HVIP is also a fit for school districts and bus companies, and there are several different makes and models of buses currently eligible for the program. In the Kings Canyon Unified School District, which serves students in a 600-square-mile area in California, alternative fuel vehicles were purchased using funds from a variety of sources.

Included were five hybrid-electric school buses built by International Coach using HVIP as a main source of funding combined with funds from the California Air Resources Board (ARB)/San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District Lower-Emission School Bus Program, the Federal Highway Administration Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program or Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District/U.S. EPA Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, and Fresno County Transportation Authority Measure C funds. The school district also received funding for an ARB AB 118 Air Quality Improvement Program Hybrid/Electric School Bus Demonstration Project to allow neighboring school districts to test the advanced technology buses.

“We continue to seek grant award opportunities that improve our clean air goals and lessen our use of conventional petroleum fuels to reduce our cost of operations,” said John D. Clements, director of transportation at Kings Canyon.

Many of the hybrid models on the road today are outfitted with Eaton hybrid systems. In Kings County, shop technicians received advance hybrid propulsion training from the manufacturer supported by a grant from the California Energy Commission. Visit www.californiahvip.org and www.calstart.org.

HYBRIDS

Magic Valley Electric Cooperative Adds Terex HyPower Hybrid
Terex Utilities has delivered a new TL41P Hi-Ranger telescopic material-handling aerial device equipped with its HyPower Hybrid System to Texas-based Magic Valley Electric Cooperative. The unit is in use at work sites in the Rio Grande Valley.

According to Rick Mendez, fleet manager at MVEC, by utilizing plug-in electric hybrid technology to operate the truck’s boom functions and accessories, the Terex TL41P HyPower truck offers Magic Valley the opportunity to lower the carbon footprint of its utility fleet while also cutting fuel costs.

“The Terex HyPower system is designed for the electric utility industry,” Mendez said. “It gets exceptional fuel economy without sacrificing productivity. And, it’s durable in all weather conditions so we’re able to use it year-round, increasing the savings we can pass on to our members while improving environmental conditions, including diesel exhaust emissions and noise pollution.”

MVEC, headquartered in Mercedes, Texas, also has facilities in Edinburg, Pharr and Brownsville. Founded in 1937 to bring electricity to the rural areas of the Rio Grande Valley, today Magic Valley has 4,800 miles of energized lines to serve more than 100,000 residential and commercial members.

The Terex TL41P HyPower truck uses stored energy from the HyPower hybrid system’s rechargeable batteries to power the nonpropulsion functions of the vehicle. MVEC’s HyPower model can work for hours without crews needing to start the vehicle engine.

“The Terex TL41P HyPower truck has been a good fit for us,” said John Herrera, MVEC general manager. “We are pleased with the productivity on projects, and our crews especially like the quietness of the truck’s operation because they are able to more easily communicate with one another on the job site.”

Since putting the Terex TL41P HyPower unit into service earlier this spring, MVEC crews have used it to change out a transformer, as well as on routine troubleshooting tasks and while servicing customer power outages.

According to Herrera, MVEC is evaluating opportunities to add more Terex HyPower trucks to its fleet. He also said that because the hybrid system can be retrofitted, the cooperative is considering adding the system to existing trucks in its fleet. Visit www.terexhypower.com.

Altec Expands Green Technologies
The Altec AT40G JEMS Aerial Device featuring an aluminum body is among the latest products to join the manufacturer’s Green Fleet product line of sustainable solutions. Aluminum bodies, according to the company, are up to 40 percent lighter than steel and weigh about 15 percent less than fiberglass, resulting in fuel savings. The bodies also allow utility fleet customers the option of a decreased gross vehicle weight rating chassis.

Integral to the Altec Green Fleet product line is the Jobsite Energy Management System (JEMS) integrated plug-in hybrid-electric system that uses stored electrical energy to power aerial devices and tools, and provide cab comfort. The energy storage system, which is recharged by plugging into shore power or by the truck’s internal combustion engine, eliminates idle time, reduces fuel consumption and lessens noise. Altec JEMS was recently approved by the U.S. EPA and complies with anti-idle legislation. Visit www.altec.com.

Odyne Systems Receives Award
The California Energy Commission, the state’s energy policy and planning agency, has awarded Odyne Systems and CALSTART an award for Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Technologies Pre-Commercial Demonstrations.

Under the award, CALSTART will function as the program manager, and Odyne Systems will demonstrate the installation of diesel plug-in hybrid electric truck systems and deploy four plug-in hybrid vehicles. CEC is contributing up to $462,600 toward the projects, along with additional funding from other partners.

The Odyne hybrid power system interfaces with Allison Transmission’s fully automatic transmissions, Remy advanced electric propulsion motors, Johnson Controls lithium-ion battery technology and other components. The hybrid drive system, according to the company, reduces fleet operating and maintenance costs and, depending on duty cycle, enables trucks to obtain fuel economy improvements of up to 50 percent compared to diesel or gasoline engines. Visit www.odyne.com, www.allisontransmission.com and www.calstart.org.

Ford Expects to Double Hybrid Vehicle Production
Since their introduction last fall, Ford has seen rising demand for its C-MAX Hybrid and Fusion Hybrid vehicles among fleet customers, and now expects to double hybrid production. The sales growth, according to the OEM, is the result of savings in costs of as much as 45 percent compared to gasoline engines and typically higher resale values.

Ford now offers a number of hybrid-electric vehicles:
• C-MAX Hybrid: EPA-estimated rating of 47 mpg city, highway and combined.
• C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid: EPA-estimated city rating of 108 mpg equivalent and 21 miles of all-electric range, and an EPA-estimated gas-plus-electric range of 620 miles.
• Fusion Hybrid: EPA-estimated rating of 47 mpg city, highway and combined.
• Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid: EPA-estimated gas-plus-electric range of 620 miles, electric-only range of up to 21 miles, and EPA-estimated rating of 108 mpg equivalent city, 92 mpg equivalent highway and 100 mpg equivalent combined.

“Fleet customers are looking for fuel-efficient, durable vehicles that can withstand the daily use and duty cycles of their businesses,” said Jon Coleman, Ford commercial fleet sustainability and technology manager. “Ford’s Fusion Hybrid and C-MAX Hybrid give them the tools they need to get the job done.” Visit www.ford.com.

XL Hybrids Partners with Knapheide Manufacturing
A distribution and installation agreement between XL Hybrids, developer of a hybrid-electric powertrain for Class 1 to 3 commercial vehicles, and The Knapheide Manufacturing Co., a commercial vehicle equipment provider, will provide one-stop purchase, upfit, delivery and invoicing for fleets. Through the new partnership, Knapheide will install XL Hybrids’ technology in its existing ship-through network. Deliveries will begin in August with new 2014 model year Chevy Express and GMC Savana vans, and will cover pool vehicles and retrofits for 2010 to 2013 GM cargo vans. Visit www.xlhybrids.com and www.knapheide.com.

NATURAL GAS

Williamson County Fleet Saves on Fuel Costs with Propane Autogas
On an annual basis, by running fleet vehicles on propane autogas, Williamson County, Texas, expects to save $73,000 on fuel costs. The central Texas county began converting vehicles to propane in 2009, and now operates 36 autogas-powered units. In addition to saving fuel costs, the county was also able to take advantage of a 50-cent per gallon Alternative Fuel Motor Tax Credit, a federal incentive available through the IRS for fleets that choose propane autogas.

The 36 autogas-powered vehicles in the Williamson County fleet include eight with dedicated systems and 26 with bi-fuel systems, a popular option for converting existing vehicles to autogas.

“We are pleased to be able to convert part of our fleet to propane autogas, which is domestically produced in Texas, and is less expensive than gasoline or diesel fuels,” said Williamson County Commissioner Cynthia Long. “In addition to being more economical, autogas is cleaner burning, which makes it better for engine maintenance and emissions.”

With more than 700 fueling stations across the state, propane autogas is widely available throughout Texas. Williamson County has built six autogas fueling stations, each with a storage capacity of 2,000 pounds.

“Williamson County is just one of the many U.S. fleets making the transition to propane autogas,” said Jackie Mason, education and marketing director of the Propane Council of Texas. “Across Texas, more fleets are choosing autogas because it’s environmentally friendly, cost-effective and made in America.” Visit www.procot.org.

Alliance AutoGas Announces New Propane Autogas Vehicle Conversion Centers
Two Wisconsin companies, Dave Jones Inc. and the Fillback Family of Dealerships, have joined Alliance AutoGas to perform EPA-certified propane autogas vehicle conversions. The new conversion centers will work with Alliance fueling provider Charter Fuels. Alliance AutoGas is the exclusive U.S. distributor of Prins autogas systems, including the bi-fuel Prins Vapor Sequential Injection system, which is EPA certified for more than 200 vehicle types.

The Fillback Family of Dealerships has converted Ford Crown Victoria cruisers, Ford E-350 vans and a Chevrolet Silverado truck to propane autogas for customers. Dave Jones Inc. is a mechanical contractor that has converted seven Ford E-350s in its fleet and plans to continue adding propane autogas vehicles to its operation. Visit www.allianceautogas.com.

ROUSH CleanTech Announces Production of Ford F-650 Propane Autogas Fuel Systems
With production beginning in October, ROUSH CleanTech is now taking orders for Ford F-650 propane autogas fuel systems. Offered in two tank size configurations, the systems include an 80-gallon fuel capacity for trucks equipped with nonskirted bodies and a 45-gallon solution for skirted bodies. Both versions are a dual saddle tank design with a single refueling point.

A Tier 1 supplier, ROUSH CleanTech is the only Ford qualified vehicle modifier manufacturer offering dedicated propane autogas fuel systems. With up to a 30,000-pound gross vehicle weight rating, the propane autogas Ford F-650 delivers the same horsepower, torque and towing capacity as the OEM’s gasoline-fueled model, and has California Air Resources Board and EPA certifications.

“The new ROUSH CleanTech Ford F-650 is another example of the versatility of abundant, clean and price-competitive propane autogas,” said Roy Willis, president and CEO of the Propane Education & Research Council, which co-funded development of the fuel system.

Ford offers a full line of commercial vehicles prepped from the factory with gaseous fuel-ready engines. Visit www.roushcleantech.com.

Quantum Awarded Grant to Develop Natural Gas Truck Engine
The California Energy Commission has selected Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide to receive a natural gas fuel system and engine development grant of $1 million to develop a natural gas engine for Class 3 to 7 vehicles. Southern California Gas has also committed funding to help the project meet its technical goals.

The CEC grant will fund the development and validation of a low-cost, multiport fuel-injected natural gas fuel system and engine with advanced controls designed for Class 3 to Class 7 fleet applications. Quantum’s partners in the project include Power Solutions International, a clean-tech engine manufacturer, technology and strategy consultancy Ricardo, and the University of California, Riverside.

The project will utilize PSI’s new 8.8-liter engine and target a 20 percent improvement in fuel economy and a 16 percent improvement in power density for the natural gas version for medium-duty applications.

Two nationwide networks of truck integrators that are building the capability to convert aftermarket diesel truck fleets to run on natural gas have placed $1.4 million in orders from Quantum for its Q-Lite CNG tanks and bolt-on natural gas fuel storage systems.

Quantum has also announced an agreement with ZHRO Solutions to develop fully integrated compressed natural gas storage and fuel delivery systems for medium- and heavy-duty diesel fleets. The company will engineer and develop fuel delivery modules and integrate its Q-Lite natural gas vehicle storage systems with ZHRO’s natural gas injection/engine conversion system. Visit www.qtww.com.

GE Unveils LNG In A Box
Calling it another key step toward accelerating the use of natural gas as transportation fuel, GE Oil & Gas has introduced a small-scale, plug-and-play, redeployable liquefied natural gas (LNG) fueling solution.

LNG In A Box is a modular fueling solution with a production range of 10,000 to 50,000 gallons per day. Typical LNG tanks for heavy-duty vehicles hold an average of 70 to 150 gallons, so one 10,000-gallon-a-day system would be able to fuel up to 100 trucks per day.

Each LNG In A Box unit is equipped with a gas pretreatment system, cold box assembly and boil-off gas compressor, as well as a GE turboexpander compressor, high-speed reciprocating compressor, electric motor, driver and control system.

The LNG In A Box system will be deployed initially in Europe by Gasfin and is expected to encourage transition of trucks from diesel fuel to LNG in North America in the future. LNG In A Box units will be manufactured in the U.S. and shipped to Gasfin LNG fueling sites in Europe. Visit www.ge.com.

ELECTRIC TRUCKS

E-Truck Task Force Findings Being Put in Motion
Recommendations of the E-Truck Task Force – formed as a subgroup of the Hybrid, Electric and Advanced Truck Users Forum to target specific issues in the electric truck market and speed and support effective electric truck production and use – are being acted on by CALSTART.

Infrastructure
Actions include a newly launched program targeting workplace charging for electric vehicles. CALSTART also operates an advisory work group and is about to publish a best practices guide for installing charging systems at workplaces. The group plans several regional workshops around the country on this topic.

Vehicle Cost and Battery Contribution
E-TTF has developed a program aimed at driving higher battery pack volumes around common sizes and is working with fleets and the U.S. Army to pinpoint performance standards. Also underway is a project with the Army to validate for military and commercial use a lithium-ion version of a standardized battery module.

Incentives
The task force has accelerated work on extending incentives for electric trucks, specifically using vouchers. The group has published a white paper on the value of vouchers and how to structure a voucher program. New e-truck voucher programs have launched in New York and will be launched in Chicago.

Fleet Business Case
CALSTART has held training sessions at the NAFA Institute & Expo on life-cycle cost assessment of e-trucks and the use of its eTruck Business Case Calculator. The group is also holding regional fleet workshops on the subject.

Initially, the E-TTF issued recommendations for minimizing costs, improving vehicle quality and support, and providing better performance validation data and business case information, including data on charging infrastructure requirements and costs. Some of the task force recommendations identified core issues of trucks already in the field. That effort, testing and validating of trucks in a variety of applications continues as well. CALSTART also works with electric trucks in the California Hybrid, Efficient and Advanced Truck Research Center. Visit www.calstart.org.

TransPower Receives Grant to Develop All-Electric Tractor
The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District has awarded TransPower a grant to develop an all-electric heavy-duty tractor. The company said Class 8 electric tractors, which are capable of hauling loads up to 80,000 pounds, have shown the ability to operate for as long as 12 hours on a single battery charge. The technology includes an onboard inverter-charger that accelerates battery charging.

TransPower also offers the ElecTruck electric drive system for short duty-cycle trucks and buses. Electric drive motors are used to propel these vehicles, with all of their energy obtained from onboard batteries. Visit www.transpowerusa.com.

Chevrolet Spark Named Most Efficient U.S. Electric Vehicle
With a combined city/highway electric range estimated at 82 miles by the EPA, a fully charged 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV has a fuel economy of 119 mpg equivalent. The Spark EV goes on sale initially this summer in California and Oregon.

The Spark EV features an oil-cooled permanent magnet motor and drive unit that will produce 130 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque, and a lithium-ion battery pack capable of handling multiple DC fast charges daily.

An available option is a recently approved SAE combo charger for DC fast charging that will enable the Spark EV to recharge up to 80 percent of its capacity in approximately 20 minutes. Charging can also be completed in fewer than seven hours using a dedicated 240-volt charge. Visit www.chevrolet.com.

Green-Fleets-Green-Truck-Summit-Web

Real-World Solutions: Green Truck Summit 2013

Registration is now open for the work truck industry’s educational forum on clean vehicle technologies – the Green Truck Summit that kicks off The Work Truck Show 2013.

Offering fleet managers practical ideas and solutions for implementing new green practices, the Green Truck Summit 2013’s slate of presenters will cover clean technology and fuel trends, deployment strategies, viable alternative fuels and funding opportunities.

On the summit’s agenda are a range of technical experts and industry leaders, including representatives from truck and engine OEMs, government agencies and fleet operations. The Green Truck Summit features 24 breakout sessions, five general sessions and two keynote addresses.

The Green Truck Summit 2013 will begin with a speech by Lee J. Styslinger III, chairman and chief executive officer of Altec Inc. Altec is developing a next generation of hybrid-electric, all-electric and range-extended electric work trucks. In 2012, the equipment and service provider opened a new green-focused assembly plant.

Dr. Michael Pacheco, associate laboratory director for deployment and market transformation at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will address the Green Truck Summit as well, sharing insights into clean energy deployment, including programs that affect commercial vehicles and fleet operations. The focus of NREL is on achieving widespread adoption of more efficient and renewable technology, including alternative fuels and advanced vehicles.

The general session lineup at the Green Truck Summit will include the following sessions:
• Trends in Clean Technologies and Fuels
• OEM Perspectives on the Future of Clean Technologies
• Modeling the Benefits of Deploying Green Technologies
• Optimizing Engines: New Ideas to Be Clean and Efficient
• Compounding the Green: Incremental Measures for Going Green and Sustainable

Breakout sessions scheduled for the summit will cover propane, hydrogen fuel cells, natural gas, hybrid-electric systems, bi-fuel CNG and LPG systems, turbine-electric trucks, truck updates and other fuel-saving advancements. The complete Green Truck Summit schedule is available at www.ntea.com/greentrucksummit/schedule.

Presented by International Truck, the Green Truck Summit is produced jointly by NTEA, the Association for the Work Truck Industry, and CALSTART, a nonprofit organization that works nationally to foster the rapid growth of the clean transportation technology industry. The event precedes The Work Truck Show, which also includes a Green Truck Ride-and-Drive, sponsored by Hino Trucks, where attendees can experience the latest in clean vehicle technology. On the show floor, the CALSTART Clean Technologies and Fuels Pavilion features green equipment that is commercially available today.

The Green Truck Summit runs March 5-6 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis. Summit registration includes admission to The Work Truck Show. To register, visit www.ntea.com or call 800-441-6832.

HYBRIDS

Eaton Developing Predictive Battery Management Technology
A power control system to reduce the size of hybrid system batteries is under development by Eaton Corp. The goal of the $2.5 million project, funded jointly by Eaton and a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, is to reduce the size of the battery by 50 percent and improve the performance of the system and its charge rate while maintaining fuel economy and overall vehicle performance.

The development project will be led by Eaton’s Innovation Center team in Southfield, Mich., which will work with a team from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Eaton’s engineers and scientists will leverage the company’s expertise in intelligent power management systems and hybrid technology with NREL’s expertise in battery modeling and prognostics.

“This project is a continuation of Eaton’s keen focus on hybrid technology development and our confidence in the value of hybrids for the future,” said Tom Stover, chief technology officer for Eaton’s Vehicle Group. “Eaton is continuing to invest in developing the infrastructure that supports the future of the transportation industry, and this project is an example of how we are working to find safe, efficient and sustainable ways to improve hybrid vehicle performance.” Visit www.roadranger.com.

GE and Ford Collaboration
GE has announced it will purchase 2,000 new Ford C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrids for its fleet. The purchase of Ford C-MAX Energi vehicles is another step in GE’s commitment to convert half of its global fleet to alternative fuel vehicles. The addition of the 2,000 plug-in hybrids brings the number of alternative fuel vehicles in GE’s fleet to more than 5,000. To date, GE employees have driven approximately 18 million miles in alternative fuel vehicles, saving about $2 million in fuel costs and reducing emissions by approximately 12 million pounds.

The Ford C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid provides a 21-mile electric-only range and a 620-mile single-tank driving range for a city EPA rating of 108 mpg.

As part of the collaboration, Ford will jointly market GE’s WattStation charging station and CNG In A Box natural gas fueling station to its commercial vehicle customers. The OEM will also supply new alternative fuel vehicles for use at GE’s Vehicle Innovation Center.

The two companies will also work with the Georgia Institute of Technology on data collection and analysis to study employee driving and charging habits, with the goal of improving all-electric driving and charging performance. Study findings will be shared with commercial customers to provide insights and help facilitate alternative fuel vehicle deployment across the country. Visit www.ford.com.

Hybrid Bus Team Recognized for ‘Visionary Leadership’
Eaton Corp. was part of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition team, along with the Kentucky Department of Education, that received the first-ever Visionary Leadership Award from the Southeast Diesel Collaborative. SEDC is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Clean Diesel Campaign to reduce pollution emitted from diesel engines.

The KCFC team provides hybrid-electric school buses to the state of Kentucky under a $12 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Eaton assembles the hybrid system, including the clutch, electric motor, battery and six-speed automated transmission. As part of Kentucky’s hybrid bus program, Eaton offers training for drivers, mechanics and first responders. It also provides a technical overview for local communities.

With 162 buses fitted with Eaton hybrid systems, Kentucky has the largest hybrid school bus fleet in the U.S. On average, the hybrid buses are 34 percent more fuel efficient than traditional diesel-powered models. In some cases fuel consumption has been cut in half, depending on driving cycles and styles. The buses, which are used in a wide range of school districts across Kentucky, are typically driven 10,000 to 15,000 miles per year and have a 14-year life. Visit www.roadranger.com.

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Chicago Awards Electric Garbage Truck Contract
Chicago is set to become the first U.S. city to deploy all-electric, zero-emissions garbage trucks. The five-year contract issued by the city to Motiv Power Systems will put in service 20 Class 8 EV refuse trucks with a GVWR of 52,000 pounds and a range of 60 miles.

The city of Chicago, which operates 600 garbage trucks, chose to request bids for electric refuse trucks after evaluating hybrid and compressed natural gas options. The city found that its garbage routes did not enable those technologies to be financially viable compared to the all-electric option.

Additionally, it has been validating the Motiv electric Powertrain Control System (ePCS) since March 2012 in an all-electric bus. The pilot program, funded by a grant to Motiv from the California Energy Commission, placed the 20-passenger bus, which can cover more than 120 miles on a single charge, in service.

Motiv’s ePCS uses off-the-shelf batteries and motors, which can be mixed and matched to fit the exact size of medium- to heavy-duty electric vehicles from 15,000 to 52,000 pounds. The Chicago refuse trucks, slated to be the heaviest electric vehicles in the U.S., will have the same ePCS system as the pilot bus, but include a larger motor and 10 battery packs. Motiv will work with Detroit Chassis to install the ePCS on a standard refuse chassis and Loadmaster will provide the truck bodies. Visit www.motivps.com.

GM Sets Sights on Electrification
By 2017, General Motors plans to have up to 500,000 vehicles on the road with some form of electrification. Included is a focus on plug-in systems like those used in the Chevrolet Volt extended-range electric vehicle introduced in 2010. The same technology is planned for the Cadillac ELR and the Chevrolet Spark EV, which will go on sale next year in certain U.S. markets. Additionally, the OEM is on track to sell more than 50,000 vehicles this year with electrification, including Chevrolet and Buick models with its eAssist light electrification technology.

Since 2010, Chevrolet Volt operators, including a number of fleets, have collectively driven more than 100 million all-electric miles. The average Volt travels more than 65 percent of the time in pure electric mode, only using the gasoline-powered generator for longer trips. In total, according to the manufacturer, Volts in service have saved 5 million gallons of fuel, equivalent to $21 million in overall gasoline costs based on $4 per gallon. For the first 38 miles, a Volt can operate using only a full charge of electricity stored in its 16.5-kWh lithium-ion battery. When the Volt’s battery runs low, a gas-powered engine/generator extends the driving range another 344 miles on a full tank.

When it arrives in California next summer, the 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV will have undergone more than 200,000 hours of battery testing. The Spark EV is driven by a coaxial drive unit powered by an oil-cooled, permanent magnet motor that produces at least 100 kW (130 HP) and torque of about 400 pounds per feet. More than 75 percent of the propulsion system components are from the Volt and GM’s hybrid truck programs. The vehicle’s more than 20-kWh lithium-ion battery pack is capable of handling multiple DC Fast Charges of up to 80 percent of battery capacity in approximately 20 minutes. Charging can also be completed in fewer than seven hours using a dedicated 240-volt charge. Visit www.gm.com and www.chevrolet.com.

Protean’s In-Wheel Solution
In multiple demonstration vehicles, including a Ford F-150 pickup truck, the Protean Drive fully integrated, in-wheel motor, direct-drive solution from Protean Electric is showing fuel economy improvements up to 30 percent depending on battery size. Designed to fit within the space of a conventional 18-inch road wheel, the system’s 68-pound motors each produce 81 kW (110 HP) and 590 pounds per feet of torque and, through regenerative braking capabilities, allow up to 85 percent of available kinetic energy to be recovered. Visit www.proteanelectric.com.

Mobile Electric Power Produces Results
In Austin, Texas, Energy Xtreme’s cleantech mobile electric power idle reduction solution has been installed in 33 of the city’s public works trucks and more than 600 Austin Police Department vehicles. Additional units have been retrofitted on Austin Energy and water utility department trucks. The producer of mobile power idle reduction systems has also installed its solution in an Austin EMS ambulance.

The Energy Xtreme mobile power idle reduction system is a smart power management device that provides power, without engine engagement, to vehicles with demanding electrical needs. The system allows a vehicle’s auxiliary electrical systems to operate without having to idle the vehicle’s engine and automatically recharges while the vehicle is being driven. Visit www.energyxtreme.net.

PROPANE & NATURAL GAS

Propane-Powered Buses
CleanFUEL USA and Collins Bus Corp. have delivered 134 propane autogas school buses to First Student Inc., the largest provider of student transportation services in North America. The buses will be used by First Student to provide service to Seattle Public Schools and Portland (Oregon) Public Schools. The purchase of the buses was made possible through grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

The Collins propane-powered NEXBUS is built on a dual rear-wheel GM chassis and utilizes a GM 6.0-liter engine. It has an estimated range in excess of 300 miles and is available in capacities up to 32 passengers. The propane autogas fuel system was developed in partnership with CleanFUEL USA and has obtained certification from both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board. Propane autogas, the third most widely used transportation fuel after gasoline and diesel, averages 40 to 50 percent fewer emissions per gallon. Visit www.cleanfuelusa.com and www.collinsbuscorp.com.

SuperShuttle Deploys 75th Alternative Fuel Vehicle
An operator of propane autogas vehicles since 2009, SuperShuttle has placed its 75th propane-powered shuttle in service in Phoenix. The alternative-fueled van is equipped with a ROUSH CleanTech propane autogas engine fuel system.

During its life cycle, each SuperShuttle propane autogas shuttle will release 175,000 fewer pounds of carbon dioxide than it would if it were operating on gasoline, the company noted. SuperShuttle franchisees operating these alternatively fueled vehicles are saving an average of $200 per week, or $10,400 per year, based on historically lower propane autogas costs and reduced maintenance. Visit www.roushcleantech.com.

Linde Demonstrates Mobile LNG Fueling
Linde North America has conducted a successful trial of its new LNG mobile fueling unit and plans to expand its use of mobile fuelers to help fleets make the transition to LNG fuel. Linde operates cryogenic plants and makes several million deliveries of cryogenic gases annually. It offers the technologies, equipment, supplies and services for LNG fueling solutions, including producing and servicing mobile and permanent refueling stations. Visit www.lindelng.com.

Alliance AutoGas Adds to Its Clean Fueling and Conversion Network
Alliance AutoGas welcomes new Canadian partner Wilsons Fuel Company Ltd. to its expanding clean vehicle fueling and conversion network. Wilsons brings the Alliance program to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador for fleets running on propane autogas. The Alliance program guides fleets through every aspect of switching to propane, including vehicle conversions, fueling, on-site fuel station installation, data integration, training and technical support. The Alliance AutoGas partner network now spans 40 states, Washington D.C. and seven Canadian provinces. Visit www.allianceautogas.com.

GAS & CLEAN DIESEL

Clean Diesel Technology Delivering for the Future
Advancements in clean diesel technology over the past decade, in conjunction with new research and development in all types of diesel engines, will play a major role in helping meet the updated Clean Air Act particulate matter (soot) standards announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“For the last decade, diesel technology has undergone a fundamental transformation to near zero emissions, based on ultralow sulfur diesel fuel, advanced clean-burning engines and new emissions control technology,” said Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum. “These advancements have occurred across the board, from the smallest industrial engine to increasingly popular clean diesel cars, commercial trucks, and off-road machines and equipment. The results of these efforts are clear since today, according to EPA, diesel engines account for only a small portion of the national PM emissions inventory – less than 6 percent.

“These last 10 years truly are the decade of clean diesel and the results are visible today,” Schaeffer continued. “New highway diesel truck engines have near zero emissions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen – a remarkable 98 percent less than 1988 models. It is also noteworthy that truck and engine manufacturers are not only producing near zero-level emissions, but these vehicles are also consuming an average of 5 percent less fuel. Just how significant is this accomplishment? Consider that it now takes 60 of today’s clean diesel heavy-duty trucks to equal the particulate emissions of one 1988 truck – a 60-to-1 ratio.”

Similar reductions in emissions of particulates and oxides of nitrogen are well underway and will be completed by 2014 for the wide range of off-road engines found in everything from small construction to large off-road equipment.

“Beyond the new technology advancements in reducing particulate emissions, there are opportunities for modernizing and upgrading existing diesel engines and equipment,” Schaeffer noted. “We are continuing to work with national environmental and health organizations to increase funding for the highly successful voluntary and incentive-based Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, which is helping to modernize and upgrade older diesel engines in school and transit buses, commercial trucks and construction equipment.”

Visit www.dieselforum.org.

Mack and Volvo Receive Greenhouse Gas Certificates
The full lineup of model year 2014 trucks and tractors from Mack Trucks and Volvo Trucks is now certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in accordance with 2014 fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas regulations. Visit www.macktrucks.com and www.volvotrucks.us.com.

Navistar Announces Clean Engine Technology Plan
Navistar International Corp. said it will introduce its next generation clean engine solution – In-Cylinder Technology Plus (ICT+) – to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions regulations for 2010 and position the company to meet greenhouse gas rules in advance of 2014 and 2017 requirements. The ICT+ technology combines Navistar’s advanced in-cylinder engine solution with urea-based aftertreatment. Visit www.navistar.com.

GMC and Chevrolet Bi-Fuel Pickup Production Begins
Now underway is production of the 2013 Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra 2500 HD bi-fuel pickup trucks. Powered by Vortec 6.0-liter V-8 engines, the trucks run on gasoline or compressed natural gas (CNG) and seamlessly switch between the two fuels. CNG and gasoline tanks have a combined range of 650 miles. The Type-3 single-tank CNG system in the Silverado HD and Sierra 2500 HD is designed to retain more bed space. The pickups are available in standard and long-box and two- or four-wheel drive in the extended cab models.

GM and Chevrolet bi-fuel pickups are ordered from the factory, sent to tier-one supplier IMPCO for installation of the CNG bi-fuel delivery and storage system, and then delivered to the dealer or to an upfitter. The vehicles meet all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board emission certification requirements.

“At Chesapeake Energy Corp., we are converting our fleet of more than 5,000 vehicles to run on natural gas, and having options from GMC and Chevy is critical to help us reach our conversion goal,” said Nate Pumphrey, director of fleet operations. “Following our full conversion, we will save $11 million to $12 million annually on fuel costs. As a fleet manager, the stable price of natural gas is another major benefit that helps me budget more accurately, and the fuel’s reduced emissions align with Chesapeake’s commitment to environmental excellence.”

Visit www.gm.com and www.chevrolet.com.

OILS & LUBES

Phillips 66 Offers Natural Gas Engine Oils
To support customers using natural gas-powered vehicles, Phillips 66 Lubricants has introduced natural gas engine oils. The Phillips 66, Conoco and 76 Lubricants and Guardol NG and Kendall Super-D NG products are designed for use in trucks powered by compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas as well as in other natural gas-powered mobile equipment.

The new oils from Phillips 66 are formulated to meet the enhanced wear protection requirements of diesel-conversion natural gas engines. Lubricants for natural gas engines must protect against a larger range of conditions than diesel engine lubricants. To meet these special requirements for converted diesel engines, the oils offer temperature and oxidation control, balanced ash content to prevent valve stem deposits and reduce valve seat recession, and better shear stability and exhaust aftertreatment protection. The oils are approved for Cummins CES 20074 and Detroit Diesel 93K216 specifications. Visit www.phillips66lubricants.com.

RSC Bio Solutions
A manufacturer of bio-based cleaning, degreasing and lubricating products, RSC Bio Solutions is making available a line of biodegradable and nonhazardous products for fleet applications. Included is the company’s line of EnviroLogic bio-based hydraulic fluids and gear oils and SafeCare cleaners and degreasers. Visit www.rscbio.com.

Green-Fleets-Web

HTUF Report

HTUF REPORT
Held in mid-September in Charlotte, N.C., the 11th Annual High-Efficiency Truck Users Forum served again as an educational and networking event for manufacturers, suppliers, fleets and government officials interested in learning the latest about high-efficiency truck technology.

HTUF has been very successful in helping launch the first production of hybrid trucks and is credited with reducing product development time by up to two years. When the conference was first held, no major truck manufacturer was offering electric or hybrid trucks. Today, there are more than 30 different electric, hybrid electric, hydraulic hybrid and workplace hybrid trucks available.

At this year’s conference, three federal government and private industry representatives took center stage. Heather Zichal, deputy assistant to the president for energy and climate change, discussed policy initiatives to create clean energy jobs, tackle climate change and reduce dependence on oil.

Also on the HTUF agenda was Dr. Dane Boysen, program director at the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, who addressed technology research and development initiatives that ARPA-e is funding and how they are accelerating advanced technology market penetration. ARPA-e has made investments in advanced batteries, electric motors and lightweight materials that could enable fleets to dramatically reduce reliance on oil over the next decade. HTUF also featured David Mohler, senior vice president and chief technology officer at Duke Energy, who covered the increasing connections between vehicles, the grid and saving energy.

“We are very pleased to have secured key leading officials from the federal government and industry at HTUF,” said John Boesel, CALSTART president and CEO. “Clean energy jobs and reducing our dependence on oil are core elements of the president’s energy policy, and the Pentagon continues to focus on energy efficiency as a critical component of the nation’s energy security.

“Beyond conventional clean diesel engines, there are now at least five different advanced propulsion systems for commercial and military trucks,” Boesel continued. “At this year’s conference, fleets learned how each of these new drivetrains can be applied and utilized. Never before have there been such opportunities to cost-effectively transition away from dependence on the highly volatile and unstable world oil market.” Visit www.htuf.org.

Odyne Systems Showcases Plug-In Hybrid Systems
Odyne Systems LLC, a manufacturer of hybrid systems for medium- and heavy-duty work trucks, displayed its hybrid propulsion system on a Ford F-750 chassis at HTUF. Odyne plug-in hybrid systems are designed to interface with a wide variety of truck-mounted equipment. Driven through the Allison 3000 RDS transmission, the system uses a Remy electric motor in parallel with the existing drivetrain to provide launch assist and regenerative braking. At the job site, the Johnson Controls’ lithium-ion battery packs power work site applications. Visit www.odyne.com.

Kenworth Delivers with T440 CNG Truck
Kenworth Truck Co. showcased a Kenworth T440 compressed natural gas (CNG) tractor during HTUF. The T440 CNG is equipped with an 8.9-liter Cummins Westport ISL G engine and a six-speed Allison 3000 HS transmission. The model is available as a straight truck or tractor in a gross vehicle weight ranging from a heavy Class 7 vehicle at 33,000 pounds to a light Class 8 at 68,000 pounds. The ISL G engine uses a maintenance-free, three-way catalyst. Rated at 320 HP and 1,000 pounds per feet of torque, the engine’s torque curve closely matches that of its diesel counterparts. Visit www.kenworth.com.

PG&E REPORTS ON ELECTRIFICATION SAVINGS
The Electrification Coalition, a nonpartisan, not-for-profit group of business leaders committed to promoting policies and actions that facilitate the deployment of electric vehicles on a mass scale, has issued the following report on the electrification of the Pacific Gas & Electric fleet.

In 2011, the Pacific Gas & Electric vehicle fleet racked up 114 million miles of travel, many of them logged servicing lines and other equipment that deliver power to customers. As a critical service provider, PG&E must purchase vehicles capable of supporting its mission in low-probability, high-impact situations like severe unplanned power outages. In these scenarios, vehicles must sometimes travel great distances across the company’s service territory and then operate buckets and other repair equipment once on site. In fact, even routine service calls can vary greatly by distance, necessitating flexibility and putting a premium on range and refueling.

Because its vehicles have a low level of route predictability, PG&E is pursuing an acquisition strategy that prioritizes plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and electric work-site idle management systems (EWIMS), which are plug-in vehicles whose batteries provide power for a range of job site functions, but do not move the wheels. PG&E’s fleet of PHEVs is generally spread throughout its passenger cars and pickup trucks. The passenger cars are typically pool vehicles used by employees for work-related travel. These vehicles tend to travel only short distances. The pickup trucks are primarily work trucks, but are also driven by job site supervisors and foremen. PG&E’s EWIMS are Class 6 trucks and are a mix of bucket trucks and material handlers.

In addition to extended range, PG&E’s emerging fleet of PHEV pickup trucks provides the company with an additional strategic benefit. A typical PHEV relies largely on its onboard battery for power over a given mileage range. When the battery is depleted to specific level, the vehicle then relies on an onboard gasoline-powered generator to provide power to the battery, operating essentially as a gasoline-electric hybrid. PG&E has recently begun deploying a handful of retrofitted PHEV pickup trucks manufactured by companies like Orem, Utah-based VIA Motors. These vehicles currently feature between 15 and 100 kW of exportable power, and there is potential to increase that number. When these vehicles are on a job site, their onboard generator can bypass the battery and export electricity to a different destination like power tools or even a transformer.

Work site management technology is a logical fit for the duty cycle associated with PG&E’s Class 6 bucket trucks. These vehicles, which are typically located at a job site for six to eight hours per day, often consume more diesel fuel idling than driving. This is because work site repair functions – operation of the bucket and associated equipment – normally require the truck to be running, using its engine as a generator. It’s an inefficient use of fuel, but has historically been the only option. Today’s EWIMS technology utilizes an onboard battery to power job site equipment, allowing the engine to be turned off and saving fuel. The battery can be recharged by plugging into the grid or by a secondary onboard alternator that provides electricity to the battery while the vehicle is driving. The savings associated with the technology are substantial: In 2011 alone, PG&E saved more than $700,000 on fuel across its fleet of 178 EWIMS work trucks manufactured by Birmingham, Ala.-based Altec.

Finally, as an electric utility, PG&E arguably has an elevated level of interest in understanding plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) and working to support their commercialization. By the end of 2012, the company will own a total of 400 PEVs, ranking it solidly among the top three U.S. commercial fleets in terms of PEV ownership. Perhaps more interestingly, PG&E’s current fleet of PEVs have been sourced from seven different original equipment manufacturers.

A number of factors were taken into consideration as PG&E explored the possibility of adding PEVs to its fleet. The vehicles carry a great deal of promise due to a number of economic, regulatory and environmental benefits, but there are also a number of important challenges. PG&E offered insight into its decision-making process by ranking various factors and discussing their rationale around each one in detail.

Total Cost of Ownership: A vehicle’s total cost of ownership (TCO) – its upfront capital costs combined with operating costs over a specific number of years or miles traveled – is a standard tool for comparing the economics of various technologies. However, while TCO may provide a useful starting point for comparison in the abstract, a vehicle’s purchase price is a more pressing real-world consideration for many fleet operators, PG&E included. This is particularly the case when it comes to purchasing new technologies like PEVs. Any assessment of TCO will necessarily be based on a series of assumptions about performance, some of which may ultimately be less precise for the first generation of a given technology. This type of uncertainty ultimately increases the level of risk placed on the fleet customer. Utilities like PG&E can be particularly capital constrained, in the sense that budgets are often set several years in advance through regulatory filings. Therefore, the higher capital cost of PEV purchases either has to be justified to the regulator – and ultimately the rate payer – or it has to displace other spending. If a plug-in vehicle carries a cost premium of 25 percent, it means a utility with a fixed budget can only purchase four PEVs for the same cost as five traditional vehicles, leaving one vehicle in need of replacement in the field. This attrition represents an operational risk that no utility would likely take on. Therefore, in evaluating the size and timing of its PEV purchases, PG&E is mostly focused on the impact these acquisitions will have on capital budgets. Whether a fleet manager purchases or leases a vehicle, there is a monthly payment associated with it. For PEVs, this payment is currently higher than the payment for a comparable traditional vehicle. If the net of this capital premium less operational savings (reduced fuel expenditures) results in a higher total monthly outlay, it becomes hard to justify. There is intense competition for capital within PG&E, and the higher payment associated with a PEV purchase is capital that is unavailable to be spent on other projects – or booked as profit.

Access to Competitive Financing: Increasingly, fleet customers are looking to commercial financing entities to help manage the capital cost challenge of PEVs. Of course, financing is not a magic wand that can make something inherently expensive become cheap. So what PG&E is particularly interested in is managing the cost structure of PEV purchases as opposed to managing the actual cost of the vehicles. Actual vehicle costs will decline over time due to some combination of manufacturing scale and technological improvements, but the cost structure – that is, the way customers deal with the price premium on PEVs – could potentially be addressed in the near term. One possible avenue to cost management through competitive financing is an extended term on vehicle useful life. For example, PG&E currently finances its purchases of pickup trucks in line with industry common practice, which typically assumes a six- or seven-year vehicle life. However, publicly available data confirms that the age of the average light-duty truck on the road in the United States has increased every year since 2000 and now stands at more than 10 years. By extending the vehicle useful life assumed in standard financing packages for these trucks by three years, the cost premium would be spread out over a greater term, giving fleet customers more capital flexibility and encouraging more PEV purchases. It’s a challenging proposition for an unproven technology, but it’s one way PG&E is working to manage cost.

Operational Benefits: Another option for managing costs is to make sure you are capturing all the benefits. Generally speaking, in terms of performance, utilities get graded on two things: the number of service outages and the duration of those outages. In measuring the number of outages, there is essentially no discrimination between an outage that affects 10 customers and one that affects 10,000 customers. Moreover, regulators do not discriminate between outages that are unplanned and those that are planned. While unplanned outages arising from weather and other unexpected events account for some of PG&E’s service calls, planned outages to repair lines and upgrade transformers account for a substantial portion of total outages. While VIA Motors’ PHEV pickup trucks currently allow for just 15 kW of exportable power, the company is working to increase that capacity to 50 kW. In larger applications, like a retrofitted Ford F-450 from Electric Vehicles International, PG&E believes it is already possible to get close to 100 kW. Altec’s Class 6 EWIMS truck currently features 3 kW of exportable power. Considering that the power needs of the average home in California today are roughly 5 kilowatts, the possibilities for providing backup power to homes – even whole neighborhoods – during outages could be significant. Put another way, the largest portion of neighborhood transformers in the PG&E service territory are fewer than 100 kW (125 kVA). While reliably exporting this kind of power is still a speculative prospect at this point, PG&E believes it is possible to get there in the near term. If accomplished, it’s a technological milestone that would fundamentally change the utility business, allowing companies like PG&E to virtually eliminate planned outages arising from transformer maintenance and upgrades. In a business built around service reliability, this kind of operational advantage could be a game changer for improving customer relations and strengthening utilities’ standing with regulators.

Vehicle Maintenance Savings: PG&E is realizing real savings on maintenance costs for its fleet of PEVs. Conventional wisdom suggests that the savings on maintenance compared to traditional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles will be greatest for battery electric vehicles (EVs). This is because the EV drivetrain has the fewest moving parts relative to internal combustion engine vehicles. PHEVs, which retain the use of an engine and fueling system, still require oil and other fuel changes as well as general engine maintenance. Nonetheless, PG&E reports that spending on these maintenance items for its fleet of Chevy Volt PHEVs is lower than spending on comparable ICE models. PG&E attributes the savings to the relatively high portion of electric miles driven by its Chevy Volts, which have an all-electric range of 30 to 40 miles. Employees’ average trip in San Francisco, where the bulk of PG&E’s Volts are located, is just 11 miles. Two notable categories of maintenance savings being captured by PG&E are reduced spending on brake pads and tires for vehicles in San Francisco. The city’s hilly terrain takes a toll on vehicle brakes, which the company estimates it replaces every six months for traditional ICE vehicles. However, initial experience suggests that the brake pads on PG&E’s fleet of Chevy Volt PHEVs will last as long as two years between replacements under the same conditions due to regenerative braking. By essentially running the vehicle’s electric motor in reverse, regenerative braking slows the Volt as soon as the driver lets off the accelerator, converting this kinetic energy into electricity that helps recharge the battery. During actual braking, the regenerative system augments the conventional braking system, a process that offsets friction that wears on the pads. At the same time, it appears that this process is also reducing wear on tires that occurs normally during harder stopping, leading to less frequent tire replacement.

Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure: By focusing on PHEVs and EWIMS work trucks, PG&E’s vehicle electrification strategy fundamentally avoids reliance on public charging infrastructure. However, charging infrastructure located at a vehicle’s overnight parking location is still of high importance for recharging the battery after a typical day’s use. In some cases, PEVs are driven home by employees. But in other cases – such as pool vehicles – a number of units are parked at a central facility. In these cases, PG&E reports that that the cost of installing charging infrastructure can be a significant challenge. In 2011, PG&E installed 35 charging stations for pool vehicles at its downtown San Francisco headquarters. The units were installed in an underground secure parking facility. The hardware cost for individual chargers was extremely manageable at approximately $800 per unit. However, construction costs for running power into the underground facility from the street above are estimated to have been roughly $350,000 – more than 90 percent of the total project cost. PG&E reports that the necessary additional wiring ran only 350 feet, placing the cost at $1,000 per foot. The lesson as always is that cracking concrete for charging infrastructure installation is likely to be expensive in most cases. This is especially true when facilities are being retrofit, particularly in high-cost urban areas. Where companies or government agencies have the opportunity to incorporate charging infrastructure into new construction, costs can be dramatically reduced and better managed.

Sam Ori, director of policy at the Electrification Coalition, recently sat down with Dave Meisel, director of transportation services at PG&E, to get a firsthand understanding of how the company’s electrification strategy is playing out in a real-world project. What follows are highlights from the discussion.

You often talk about the unexpected benefits of PEVs for your broader business. How do EWIMS fit into that?
One of the biggest things that we have seen with our EWIMS is the noise reduction. On our traditional bucket trucks, everything is PTO-driven. A mechanical shaft from the engine runs a pump and that’s what moves the bucket. So to operate the bucket, you have to have the truck running, and it makes a lot of noise. But in residential areas of San Francisco, there are noise restrictions in place that essentially make it impossible for us to do routine work using conventional trucks between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. That’s no longer an issue with an electric bucket because it’s silent. The engine is off. It’s expanded the workday by 100 percent – from 12 hours to 24 hours. In the past, if a PG&E crew was doing new construction and it got to be 7 p.m., they had to stop. It didn’t matter if there were just two hours of work to go. They had to stop, take the whole site down – which could take about an hour – go home for the night and then come back again in the morning. At that point, they had set everything back up again – which takes another hour – do two hours of work and then take it down again. With an EWIMS bucket truck, they can just work the additional two hours on the first day and be done, avoiding unnecessary time spent getting to and from the job as well as costly setup and takedown hours. The customer is happier and we’re more efficient.

How have the drivers reacted?
I’ll go back to the noise. In the utility business, you often work in pairs. One crew member is up in the bucket and the other is at the ground level. With a traditional bucket, the crew has to communicate over the noise of a running vehicle, which can really be a challenge. But in the case of an EWIMS truck, the engine is off and it’s quiet, so communication is much, much easier. Drivers absolutely love that. I would also add that, especially in our business, an enhanced level of communication actually puts our employees in a much safer situation. When a crew member in the bucket is talking to his colleague on the ground, he is trying to get a handle on critical information that has a material impact on job safety. Making it easier to communicate and have a higher level of confidence in information has been a huge hit with our employees. That enhanced feeling of safety is something that happens every time you go to work. Without question there are other benefits. The work crews certainly appreciate not having to be around the tailpipe emissions of a traditional diesel vehicle idling on a job site over a period of several hours. And the abatement of those emissions is also good for urban air quality. That’s a significant plus for us as a corporation.

The EWIMS technology is really a perfectly customized solution. How did you get there?
The drivers of these vehicles are some of our most highly skilled personnel. They are generally our first responders. What that means operationally is that they do a lot of tickets in a single day – lots of shorter stops to deal with pressing issues. They are at an individual site for an average of maybe two hours. They make a fix and move on to the next job. We wanted a system that would work off the battery and be capable of plugging in to the grid, but that couldn’t be the only way the battery recharged. So we developed the secondary alternator that recharges the battery as the vehicle moves from job to job. We also made sure that the battery was big enough to cover all of the work that would be done in a normal day without running the vehicle at any job site. To get there I would say we worked hand in hand with Altec. They have about 70 percent of the U.S. market for bucket trucks, so they understand our business and have a commitment to customer solutions. Our vehicle design and engineering team at PG&E had an idea for an electric bucket system that we felt would save us money and provide a whole range of operational efficiencies. We sketched out our idea in principle, took it to Altec and six months later the first vehicle rolled off the production line. It has worked out really well.

People often talk about the economics of these technologies in broad generalities. What can you say about your experience?
I can tell you that we are getting about a two-and-a-half-year payback on our Class 6 EWIMS trucks. We make business decisions to make money, plain and simple. So we wouldn’t be doing this if it didn’t work for the company. To me, it all goes back to lining up the right technology with the right application. People think electrification has to be about the propulsion system only. But that isn’t where we are using the most fuel in this particular application. Electrify where it makes sense to electrify. The fleet industry uses PTO shafts in a variety of applications, by the way: dump trucks, refrigerated trucks and more. They’re all shaft-driven, and today they all use a diesel engine to power that shaft. That function could be powered by a battery in all these applications.

I know you spend a lot of time thinking about ways to be creative in terms of integrating these technologies into your business model. What have you learned from your EWIMS deployment?
When we first started looking at these vehicles, we were thinking about them in terms of payback period. So we did a standard analysis comparing current technology costs and fuel consumption to the cost of the new technology and projected fuel savings. But what we have learned is that the operating savings, improved relationship with our customers, the extended work day and the safety improvements dwarf the fuel savings. What we also learned is that, frankly, there is a lot that we as an industry can’t measure when evaluating these technologies with a standard approach to ROI or payback period. So PG&E treats each application as a unique situation and evaluates it individually. Let me also say that the economic impact of these vehicles extends beyond just PG&E. We just had the ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new facility here in Dixon, Calif., where Altec will be expanding its production capacity for these and other advanced vehicles. That’s 150 direct manufacturing jobs in the United States. And when you think about the multiplier for manufacturing jobs, which I think is about five times or six times, you are looking at almost 1,000 new jobs for the local community. That has an impact. Visit www.electrificationcoalition.org.

HYBRID VS. CONVENTIONAL 
“There has been no significant change in light-duty vehicles as a percentage of utility fleets,” said Tom Nimmo, a partner with the industry benchmarking firm Utilimarc. “However, we have seen changes within certain light-duty vehicle classes, including an increase in hybrids as a percentage of the fleet. Hybrid data also shows improved mpg and improved operating costs.”

Speaking at the 2012 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference (www.eufmc.com), Nimmo covered trends, using 2009, 2010 and 2011 data, at a select group of 41 utilities that field approximately 90,000 utility-specific vehicles. In 2012, the entire Utilimarc database, comprised of state, county, city, utility and private fleets, will track more than 300,000 vehicles. Visit www.utilimarc.com.

RALEIGH POLICE DEPARTMENT SEES SIGNIFICANT FUEL SAVINGS FROM MOBILE POWER IDLE REDUCTION SYSTEMS
Earlier this year, the Raleigh (N.C.) Police Department installed mobile power idle reduction systems in 29 police vehicles. The project was funded by an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant. Since being installed, the systems have saved Raleigh more than 3,000 gallons of fuel, cut emissions of 59,326 pounds of CO2 and reduced engine use by 107,032 miles. The police department now projects an annual fuel savings from the systems of $63,000.

The Energy Xtreme mobile power idle reduction system is a smart power management device that provides power, without engine engagement, to vehicles with demanding electrical needs. In Raleigh, the system allows police cruiser electrical systems, including lights, onboard cameras, computers and radios, to operate without having to idle the vehicle’s engine for at least four continuous hours. The system automatically recharges while the vehicle is being driven. Visit www.energyxtreme.net.

HYBRID NEWS

Eaton Supports California Hybrid Incentives
The California Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP) is getting a boost from Eaton Corporation (www.eaton.com/roadranger). Designed to assist California-based fleets with the purchase of low-emission, fuel-efficient medium- and heavy-duty hybrid vehicles, HVIP aims to help speed the introduction of hybrid trucks with financial incentives ranging from $10,000 to $45,000 for eligible vehicles.

“The Hybrid Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project offsets about half of the incremental cost of eligible hybrid vehicles,” said Gerard Devito, engineering director, Eaton hybrid power systems. “The program strongly benefits the public and commercial truck industry by helping interested fleets save money while delivering more sustainable transportation. We applaud the state of California for its pioneering work and many investments to promote and support the use of hybrid vehicles and other clean technology vehicles.”

About 87 truck and bus chassis configurations from a variety of vehicle manufacturers that are equipped with Eaton hybrid systems are eligible for the incentives. Under HVIP, incentives are preset for each qualified vehicle. Eaton hybrid power systems have collectively accumulated more than 300 million miles of service. More than 6,000 of Eaton’s hybrid systems are in use today on trucks and buses. Visit www.californiahvip.com.

ALTE LAUNCHES ELECTRIC VEHICLE FLEET PURCHASING SYSTEM
A Commitment to Action as part of the Clinton Global Initiative America designed to spur adoption of hybrid electric technology in fleets has been announced by ALTe Powertrain Technologies. The developer of a range-extended plug-in electric hybrid powertrain for light commercial fleet vehicles has pledged to develop a first-of-its-kind electric vehicle fleet purchasing system, under which fleet customers can consolidate the entire electric vehicle decision-making process in one web-based interface.

The new website, www.electrifyyourfleet.com, will connect corporate and government vehicle purchasers with electric vehicle stakeholders, including utilities, charging station providers and finance companies, and notify customers of available incentives while offering the benefits of group-rate purchases and simplifying the order-to-delivery process.

“Our commitment to the CGI community is to help solve the greatest roadblocks to commercial adoption of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles: eliminating the lack of affordability and simplifying the EV and charging station order fulfillment process,” said ALTe chief executive John Thomas. “We intend to take a crowdsourcing approach to generate a new industry buying platform that helps fleets better transition to a cleaner operation, offer financial benefits to customers and grow new jobs for the future of America.”

As an electric powertrain systems provider, ALTe will offer certified full-sized pickups and vans that have been retrofitted with electric or plug-in hybrid powertrains. Designed to replace a V-8 internal combustion engine powertrain, the system’s patented technology improves fuel economy, the company said. Visit www.altept.com.

Ford-Web

Right Tool for the Right Job

Near-, mid- and long-term alternative fuel technologies are available and under development at Ford Motor Company, reported Jim Michon, truck fleet marketing manager, during a presentation at the 2012 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference. “In the near term,” he said, “we are migrating to advanced technology. In the midterm we plan full implementation of known technology, and long term we will continue to leverage hybrid technologies and deploy alternative energy sources.”

Specific technologies Ford is addressing, according to Michon, include advanced gasoline and natural gas engines, hybrids, electrified vehicles, fuel cells and hydrogen-powered engines. The company’s path to sustainability also covers body structures, including high-strength steel and aluminum used presently, and the potential for ultrahigh-strength steel, high-strength aluminum, high-temp and reinforced plastics, magnesium and carbon fiber, and bio-based components.

Ford is also targeting aggressive levels of aerodynamic improvements and working on a variety of technologies, Michon noted. Included are auto start-stop, active transmission warm-up, grille shutter, deceleration fuel shutoff, electric power-assisted steering and battery management systems.

Michon also discussed Ford’s EcoBoost family of turbocharged, direct-injected gasoline engines, which the manufacturer claims can provide up to 20 percent better fuel economy without sacrificing power.

In an EcoBoost engine, energy from the exhaust is used to rotate a turbine coupled to a compressor that pressurizes the incoming air, significantly increasing the engine’s power output. Highly pressurized fuel is injected directly into the combustion chamber of each cylinder rather than mixing with the incoming air in the inlet port. The advantage, according to Ford, includes more precise delivery of fuel for lower emissions, improved efficiency and avoidance of knock.

Visit www.fleet.ford.com for more.

Test Drive: Chevrolet Malibu Eco
Billed as the most fuel-efficient Malibu ever, the 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Eco with eAssist technology lived up to the manufacturer’s estimated 37 mpg on highway in a weeklong test drive. The 2013 Malibu Eco is the first Chevrolet to feature eAssist. Along with specific aerodynamic enhancements, according to the OEM, it achieves 12 percent greater highway fuel economy than current models equipped with the 2.4-liter engine.

“Malibu Eco’s eAssist system integrates regenerative braking with the latest lithium-ion battery technology to give our customers significant fuel-efficiency gains,” said Steve Poulos, global chief engineer of eAssist. “Providing electric boost to the powertrain system during heavy acceleration and grade driving helps the transmission operate more efficiently. The engine’s start-stop and fuel shutoff during deceleration features add to the fuel savings.”

The eAssist system is made up of a 32-cell, 0.5-kW lithium-ion battery, an electric motor-generator and a six-speed transmission. The system’s electric motor-generator is mounted to an Ecotec 2.4-liter, four-cylinder engine, in place of the alternator, to provide both motor assist and electric-generating functions through a revised engine belt-drive system.

“The battery system is designed to provide power assistance to the internal combustion engine, rather than storing energy for all-electric propulsion,” said Poulos. “It’s really an extension of the conventional internal combustion engine, not a replacement for it.”

The motor-generator in the eAssist system is a liquid-cooled induction model that bolsters the engine with approximately 11 kW (15 HP) of electric power assist during heavy acceleration and 15 kW of regenerative braking power. This power capability enables the battery to capture energy during regenerative braking.

The air-cooled 115-V lithium-ion battery in the Malibu Eco is integrated into a power pack located in a compartment between the rear seat and trunk. The power pack is cooled by an electric fan that draws air from a vent located in the package tray, behind the rear seat.

Additional fuel-saving features on the Malibu Eco, according to the manufacturer, include an aerodynamically optimized exterior, underbody panels, and electronically controlled shutters in the lower grille that close at higher speeds to push more air over and around the vehicle. In addition, lightweight components and systems – including an aluminum hood, aluminum rear bumper beam, low-mass carpet and dash mat, and more – save approximately 130 pounds compared to comparably equipped non-Eco models.

An Eco gauge in the Malibu Eco’s instrument cluster continuously responds to driving behavior and encourages fuel-efficient driving. A power flow display in the driver information center indicates if the Malibu Eco is operating in battery-charging, electric-assist or auto-stop mode.

The eAssist system works with Malibu’s 2.4-liter Ecotec four-cylinder engine rated at 182 HP and 170 pounds per feet of torque. The Hydra-Matic 6T40 six-speed transmission in the vehicle features changes to clutch controls and hardware to reduce spin losses while improving shift response. The eAssist system’s electric assistance at cruising speeds allows the driver to accelerate lightly or ascend mild grades without the transmission downshifting, and automatic grade braking keeps the transmission in a lower gear when decelerating or coasting on a downgrade. eAssist technology also allows for a numerically lower 2.64 final drive ratio.

The Malibu Eco in our test drive also lived up to the manufacturer’s claim of achieving up to 580 highway miles between fill-ups despite a smaller fuel tank than other 2013 Malibu models at just 15.8 gallons. “It’s a very integrated powertrain system, with no compromises in driving performance, shift quality, or ride and handling,” said Todd Stone, Malibu lead development engineer. “We believe this combination points to the future of vehicles powered primarily by an internal combustion engine.”

Visit www.gmfleet.com for more.

Eaton Makes Multiple Enhancements to Its Hybrid Power System
To increase the fuel economy, performance and payback of its hybrid power system for commercial vehicles, Eaton Corporation has announced a number of enhancements. Included are a new high-capacity battery, a new single-phase 115-V AC auxiliary power generator (APG), a higher-capacity clutch to expand applications up to 860 pounds per feet of torque and a new remanufactured battery for aftermarket purchase.

At the heart of Eaton’s new high-capacity lithium-ion battery is the latest battery cell architecture. The new design increases the fuel savings of Eaton’s hybrid power system an additional 5 to 10 percent, the company noted, while more than doubling the engine-off capability of the system for job site operations.

Eaton is also introducing a new single-phase, 5-kW APG. The APG option converts high-voltage DC current from the battery to 115-volt AC current that can be used by any number of tools on the job site. The APG unit is more compact and 25 pounds lighter than Eaton’s previous offering, which increases flexibility of installation.

The new high-capacity battery and APG will be rolled out during the fourth quarter of this year for utility vehicle applications. Eaton is also now offering higher-capacity clutches that can handle engines up to 860 pounds per feet of torque and 300 HP. Eaton has begun offering a remanufactured battery.

Eaton hybrid power systems have collectively accumulated more than 300 million miles of service. More than 6,000 of Eaton’s hybrid systems are in use today in trucks and buses in a variety of applications.

Yosemite Turns To Eaton For Cleaner Vehicles
Yosemite National Park now allows visitors to enjoy its pristine surroundings onboard new low-emission vehicles powered by Eaton’s hybrid electric systems. Eaton worked with the U.S. General Services Administration and Delaware North Companies Parks and Resorts, which handles the majority of the park’s transportation needs, to deliver four new Class 8 tractors with the Eaton systems. An additional seven vehicles – 37-passenger shuttle buses – are on order.

“The low-speed, low-mileage and stop-and-go duty cycles at Yosemite provide the perfect operating conditions for a hybrid truck,” said Kevin Snow, chief engineer for hybrid applications at Eaton. “On top of that, the environmental and fuel consumption improvements are going to be quite substantial.”

Dan Anthonijsz, village garage manager at Yosemite for Delaware North Companies, agrees. “We are definitely realizing fuel consumption reductions, currently averaging about 6.7 miles per gallon with the tram tractors,” he noted. “That’s a huge improvement over the one mile to the gallon that we were getting with the propane trucks that the new vehicles replaced.”

In addition, Eaton worked with park officials to install a new engine brake on a tow truck with an Eaton hybrid electric system to ensure the regenerative braking function was operating properly. Regenerative braking allows the hybrid system to recover power normally lost during braking and stores the energy in batteries to provide engine-off power takeoff capabilities.

Visit www.eaton.com/hybrid for more.

Terex Hybrid System Retrofit Program
Terex Utilities now offers customers the option to retrofit utility trucks with the Terex HyPower Hybrid System, a plug-in power takeoff system that uses stored energy from the system’s rechargeable batteries to power the nonpropulsion functions of most utility vehicles.

The Terex HyPower Hybrid Retrofit Program can be applied to any Terex or competitive manufacturer’s aerial devices 5 years old or newer and can be completed at any of 14 Terex Equipment Services locations. For an aerial device to be considered for a HyPower retrofit, it needs to pass an initial inspection, which covers the truck’s available payload capacity, body configuration and cab-to-axle length to accommodate the battery packs. After the inspection, retrofits can be completed in as little as two weeks.

HyPower retrofitted trucks come with the standard one-year warranty from the date of in-service on the system, the same as on new HyPower equipped units.

City of Longmont, Colo., Adds Terex HyPower Trucks
Terex Utilities has sold four trucks equipped with its HyPower Hybrid System – a Terex Commander C4047 digger derrick, a Terex Hi-Ranger TCX55 bucket truck and two competitive bucket trucks retrofitted with the HyPower system – to the City of Longmont, Colo.

“We are constantly looking at the emerging technologies like the Terex HyPower Hybrid System to see what would be a good fit for Longmont,” said Deborah Cameron, customer services and marketing manager for Longmont Power & Communications. “LPC crews like that they do not have to yell over engine noise for material or direction with the Terex trucks. They also appreciate that there is no reduction in the performance of the controls while the trucks are in hybrid mode.”

The service area that LPC covers is compact so city crews do not have long drives to work sites, which, according to Cameron, made the Terex HyPower system, with its separate batteries, a smart choice. One of the retrofitted bucket trucks serves as a service truck, taking care of outages and daily calls. The other is the city’s streetlight truck. The TCX55 bucket truck is primarily used by the city’s maintenance crew.

To offset the expense of the Terex HyPower Hybrid trucks, the City of Longmont received $70,000 through the Regional Air Quality Council. In the future, Cameron noted, the city will evaluate opportunities to add more Terex HyPower trucks to its fleet.

Visit www.terexutilities.com for more.

VIA Motors is demonstrating its extended-range electric pickup truck in a partnership between the manufacturer, the state of Utah and Rocky Mountain Power, a division of PacifiCorp and Utah’s largest electric utility. PacifiCorp is part of a group of utility, government and commercial fleets nationwide participating in an early evaluation of electric work trucks developed by VIA Motors in coordination with the U.S. Department of Energy.

VIA’s VTRUX electric vehicles are equipped with a 402-HP electric motor and will be available with a power export option up to 15 kW. The vehicles can average more than 100 mpg with a daily charge and in zero-emissions mode for a majority of fleet driving, the company said. The manufacturer works with General Motors to incorporate its V-DRIVE powertrain into new GM trucks, vans and SUVs. VIA is planning to sell electrified work trucks to fleets early in 2013.

Visit www.viamotors.com for more.

Allison Transmission Inc. has invested in a noncontrolling equity stake in Odyne Systems LLC. The manufacturer of hybrid control systems designed and developed a plug-in hybrid power system, which interfaces with the Allison family of commercial vehicle transmissions.

Odyne’s proprietary and patented plug-in hybrid drive system, sold through a worldwide distribution network, can be installed on a wide variety of new and existing vehicles. Johnson Controls is the exclusive supplier of lithium-ion batteries for Odyne Hybrid Power systems.

Visit www.odyne.com and www.allisontransmission.com for more.

Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc., in association with lithium-ion battery system supplier Dow Kokam, has delivered the first pilot version of its plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) Ford F-150 pickup truck to Florida Power & Light Company.

The PHEV F-150 is powered by Quantum’s F-Drive parallel plug-in hybrid electric drive system. The F-Drive allows the truck to run the first 35 miles on a zero-emission electric drive and then switch to an efficient hybrid drive mode, achieving more than 100 mpg, according to the manufacturer, depending on the drive cycle and charging frequency.

Visit www.qtww.com for more.

XL Hybrids Inc. has released test results that it said validate a 21.2 percent reduction in fuel consumption with the company’s aftermarket hybrid electric powertrain. XL Hybrids’ powertrain is a bolt-on technology that integrates with an internal combustion engine and transmission.

The tests were conducted on a light-duty chassis dynamometer test cell. The testing process compared fuel economy performance from the vehicle in its original condition with the performance using XL Hybrids’ charge-sustaining hybrid system. The test was completed on a Chevrolet 2500 Express cargo van fitted with the OEM’s 4.8-liter engine and six-speed transmission over a light-duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule test cycle.

Visit www.xlhybrids.com for more.

ALTe Powertrain Technologies, the developer of range-extended plug-in electric hybrid powertrains, has installed its system in the Ford Econoline E-350 platform. ALTe already implemented conversions in Ford F-150 trucks. The manufacturer is delivering an E-350 prototype to a fleet customer for evaluation and plans to build more prototypes for customer evaluations throughout the year, leading to a spring 2013 product launch date for the U.S. market.

ALTe’s road tests revealed that the E-350 cutaway chassis prototype can drive approximately 25 miles in an all-electric mode and then deliver nearly 15 mpg in a charge-sustained mode, the company reported. For a fleet vehicle that drives 45 miles per day, ALTe noted, the combined mode fuel economy would be more than 30 mpg, while a similar Ford E-350 cutaway chassis with a V8 gasoline engine averages fewer than 9 mpg based on data provided by major fleets.

Visit www.altept.com for more.

SCR Engine Update
As a speaker on a “Diesel Engines – Current and Future” panel during the 2012 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference, Dave Bryant, vocational sales manager at Freightliner, reported on the performance of 2010 emissions-compliant diesel engines. “There is growing confidence in SCR engine technology,” Bryant said. “Market adoption of SCR engines in six key Class 6-8 vocational applications [refuse, utility, construction, heavy hauling, beverage and municipal] is 39 percent greater than non-SCR engines today compared to 18 percent three years ago.”

Among the findings about SCR engine performance in Bryant’s report were the following:

• Fuel economy in EPA 2010 SCR engines was initially projected to be 3 percent better than 2007 models. Customers in utility truck applications are reporting a 5 percent improvement in actual use.
• In many cases, a three-time reduction in diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration cycles between 2007 and 2010 engines is being reported, including Detroit Diesel and Cummins models. DPF regeneration, Bryant noted, requires fuel to clean out unburned fuel, so reducing regeneration frequency also has a fuel economy benefit.
• Better drivability from increased horsepower and better throttle response are evident in 2010 engines, especially in Cummins ISB, ISC and ISL models.
• Durability is improved. Cummins has seen an appreciable reduction in warranty repairs on 2010 engines compared to 2007 models, especially for turbochargers and injectors. Additionally, improved cooling system performance is resulting in reduced heat rejection, causing fewer problems.
• OEMs have addressed packaging and chassis space concerns by providing clear frame rails and back-of-cab surfaces, and by not increasing cab heights.
• DEF infrastructure concerns have turned out to be a nonissue. Meeting fleet needs are bulk DEF, and more than 6,500 DEF retail outlets and 500 pump locations.

“In 2009 we told you that 2010 EPA engines compared to 2007 pre-SCR models would have better fuel economy, improved regeneration frequency, increased power with the same displacement, enhanced drivability and better cooling system performance to reduce heat,” Bryant said. “We also said we would address vehicle packaging concerns and DEF availability issues. All of those challenges have been met.”

Visit www.daimler-trucksnorthamerica.com for more.

Peterbilt Grows Natural Gas Vehicle Market
With a 40 percent market share of the commercial truck natural gas market, including vocational and over-the-road models, Peterbilt Motors Company continues to expand its natural gas-powered vehicle offerings.

Peterbilt currently offers two natural gas engine platforms. The Cummins Westport 8.9-liter ISL G, rated 320 HP at 1,000 pounds per feet of torque, is a spark ignition engine with a three-way catalyst emissions system that can be configured with either LNG or CNG fuel systems. The second platform is the Westport HD 15-liter engine rated 475 HP and 1,750 pounds per feet of torque with diesel pilot ignition configured for LNG fuel systems.

The OEM will also offer the new Cummins Westport ISX12 G in 2013. The engine, rated up to 400 HP and 1,450 pounds per feet of torque, features spark ignition and a three-way catalyst, and can be configured with an LNG or CNG fuel system.

Visit www.peterbilt.com for more.

CARB Retrofit Alternative Fuel System Certification
The California Air Resources Board has approved the ROUSH CleanTech propane autogas fuel system for retrofitting 2010 model year 5.4-liter Ford E-150, E-250 and E-350 cargo vans and wagons. ROUSH CleanTech is also pursuing retrofit certification for 2009, 2011 and 2012 model years of the same Ford models as well as E-450 cutaway vehicle platforms.

The CARB certification is the first awarded since 2000 for a liquefied petroleum gas retrofit system, and the first CARB certification for any alternative fuel system for retrofit installation on 2010 model year vehicles. The number of alternative fuel retrofit certifications awarded has been limited due to stricter regulations implemented in 1994.

ROUSH CleanTech offers a wide range of CARB-certified, dedicated liquid propane autogas fuel systems for pre-title installation, which includes applications for Ford F-250/350 trucks, Ford E-series vans, and Blue Bird Propane-Powered Vision and Micro Bird G5 school buses.

Visit www.roushcleantech.com for more.

Green Facility
Altec Industries has opened a new green-focused facility in Dixon, Calif. The manufacturer is using the 42,400-square-foot assembly plant to expand the development and production of its Green Fleet utility vehicle product line.

Altec received guidance and support on the development of the new green-focused facility from Pacific Gas & Electric Company and Southern California Edison. In addition, PG&E and Altec are partnering to develop Green Fleet utility vehicles, which will be produced at the new plant.

“Altec is committed to sustainable solutions,” said Lee Styslinger III, Altec chairman and CEO. “That commitment to sustainability is reflected not only in the products we build, but also in the facilities where we build them.”

Visit www.altec.com for more.

Green-Fleets-Web

Advanced Technology

It is a case of mutual interests combining resources and expertise, says Matt Gilliland, fleet services manager at Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD). “In 2006 to 2007, when Chevrolet was researching and developing the technology it would eventually use in the Chevrolet Volt,” he explained, “the OEM wanted to partner with utility fleets to deploy vehicles and evaluate their performance and function in actual operations.”

The result was an extensive program managed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nonprofit center for electricity and environmental research, that put demonstration Volt models on the road at 64 U.S. and Canadian utilities. For the three-year demonstration project, which officially began in 2011, NPPD is operating one of those vehicles.

NPPD supplies power in 91 of 93 Nebraska counties to communities as well as rural public power districts and electric cooperatives. Supporting its generation, transmission and distribution businesses is a fleet of 1,150 pieces of equipment ranging in size from ATVs to 140-ton cranes. Included are SUVs, pickups and vans, and a range of medium- and heavy-duty trucks.

The collaborative effort between EPRI, General Motors and NPPD is evaluating a 2011 Chevy Volt. The demonstration project will work to ensure safe and convenient electric vehicle charging, raise public awareness and understanding of plug-in electric vehicles, assist electric utilities in determining the support for charging vehicles and help public policy leaders better understand how electricity can be used as a vehicle fuel source. The program is made possible in part by a $30.5 million grant administered by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Recovery Act Transportation Electrification Initiative.

Equipped with a 120-kW electric motor that is equivalent to a 150-HP engine, the electric-powered, extended-range vehicle can travel approximately 35 miles on a full charge. After the battery is depleted, the onboard 80-HP gasoline engine and generator can power the Volt for an additional 372 miles for a total cruising range of 407 miles.

Working its way across Nebraska as a fleet vehicle, the Volt at NPPD is being used at 42 company locations in a variety of environments and under differing weather conditions. Data on the vehicle being supplied to EPRI will be included in aggregate results from all 64 utilities taking part in the project. In addition to performance information from onboard data capture devices, the utilities are helping determine charging and circuit-loading patterns and electric charging infrastructure readiness.

Behind NPPD’s participation in the demonstration project is the utility’s Domestic Energy Research and Application Initiative, which has funds for developing technologies related to environmental issues. “We’ve funded programs for energy research with the University of Nebraska, wind monitoring and carbon capture,” Gilliland noted, “so it made sense to leverage our resources to look into advanced vehicle technology as well. One of the benefits of this program was that by getting involved, we had access to some of the first Volts to come off the production line.

“One of the biggest benefits of the demonstration project,” Gilliland continued, “was that we formed a strong industry partnership where information flowed both ways. That will help us determine if this technology is right for our operation and our customers at the right cost.”

As for the Chevy Volt, Gilliland says it has done everything it was supposed to do. “It’s a great platform,” he stated. “This is one of the biggest advances in automotive technology in many years.”

HYBRID SOLUTIONS

Terex HyPower
The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has approved the Terex HyPower hybrid system for use in any power takeoff-equipped diesel-powered truck application with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of more than 10,000 pounds. This means the HyPower hybrid system meets the strict emissions requirements for anti-idling in the state of California, which many other states have adopted for fleets that are bidding on projects or requesting project funding.

CARB’s approval of the Terex HyPower hybrid system allows contractors and fleets to purchase new trucks with the system or retrofit older trucks. The Terex HyPower hybrid system enables job site operations without requiring the engine to be running, reducing harmful exhaust emissions and noise and lowering fuel use. According to Terex, the system can save up to 1,500 gallons of fuel per year based on 7,000 miles per year and 1,250 job site hours per year.

Visit www.terexhypower.com for more.

Altec
CARB has approved the Altec Jobsite Energy Management System (JEMS) when used in any power takeoff (PTO), diesel-fueled truck application with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds. Altec JEMS is a product of Altec’s Green Fleet, designed to eliminate engine idle time at the job site and reduce fuel consumption, noise and emissions. JEMS is an integrated plug-in system powered by application-specific battery packs. The system provides power for aerial devices, truck cab heating and air conditioning, and export power for hand tools and other electrical accessories.

Visit www.altec.com/green-fleet.php for more.

Eaton
Eaton Corporation has published a fact sheet on hybrid electric power systems for commercial trucks to help fleets determine whether the technology is the correct platform for their operations. The document covers applications, job site operation time, stop densities, vehicle speeds, driving techniques, warranty information and more. It also lists key specification information. More than 5,500 Eaton hybrid systems are in use today on utility vehicles and other commercial applications, and have collectively accumulated more than 200 million miles of service.

Visit www.roadranger.com for more.

Odyne Systems
Odyne Systems LLC has completed five plug-in hybrid vehicles funded by a U.S. Department of Energy development project and has delivered the vehicles to customers of DUECO Inc., the final stage truck manufacturer. Companies receiving the new technology include:
• Choptank Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, which took delivery of a plug-in hybrid bucket truck with a Terex HR42M aerial device to be used in maintenance of electric lines;
• Consumers Energy, the principal subsidiary of CMS Energy, which took delivery of a plug-in hybrid utility truck with a Terex 5FC55 aerial device;
• NiSource, which took delivery of a plug-in hybrid bucket truck with a Terex TL41 aerial device for use in maintenance and construction of its electrical grid;
• NV Energy, which took delivery of an underground utility vehicle featuring a Vanair underdeck compressor for maintenance of an underground natural gas infrastructure; and
• Pepco Holdings Inc., which took delivery of a plug-in hybrid underground utility vehicle with a Vanair underdeck compressor for underground gas infrastructure maintenance.

Odyne has also delivered seven trucks featuring its plug-in hybrid propulsion system to utilities and municipalities throughout Wisconsin. Communities and utilities receiving the new technology were partially funded under the Wisconsin Clean Transportation Program jointly administered through the Wisconsin State Energy Office and the U.S. Department of Energy Wisconsin Clean Cities Program. The new units are anticipated to deliver 50 percent better fuel efficiency than a conventional truck annually, depending upon use.

Receiving vehicles with the Odyne hybrid systems is Milwaukee County, which took delivery of four work trucks that will be used to maintain traffic signals and street lighting. The vehicles feature the first Odyne hybrid systems installed on Kenworth truck chassis and are the first to power Venturo corner mount cranes. The trucks also have fiberglass bodies and Terex TL60 aerials.

Marshfield Utilities, serving the city of Marshfield, Wis., took delivery of a Navistar truck fitted with the Odyne system and a Terex HRX55 boom for use in construction and maintenance of the Marshfield utility grid. The Richland Center and Lake Mills units of Wisconsin Public Power Inc. will also be putting new Navistar chassis with Terex TCX60 booms and the Odyne hybrid system in service for the construction and maintenance of utility grids.

Odyne’s proprietary hybrid technology combines electric power conversion, power control and energy storage technology with Remy electric propulsion motors, modular Johnson Controls lithium-ion battery systems and other automotive components.

Visit www.odyne.com for more.

BAE Systems
The BAE Systems HybriDrive parallel system for Class 6, 7 and 8 vocational trucks is a scalable design that can be modified for a range of truck platforms, vocations and duty cycles. HybriDrive parallel is based on a motor/generator integrated between the engine and the transmission and an energy storage system, coupled with electronic controls. The system’s battery pack and electronics are sealed for under-vehicle environments.

Visit www.baesystems.com for more.

NATURAL GAS

Venchurs Vehicle Systems
Venchurs Vehicle Systems (VVS) is showcasing its new CNG and bi-fuel conversions for Ford F-250/350 trucks. The Venchurs CNG program includes dedicated CNG and bi-fuel systems that allow for seamless switching of the fuel supply and offer a range of up to 650 miles. VVS has built a CNG Search & Rescue Ford F-250 concept truck with its bi-fuel system for pilot program demonstrations by national park rangers. Each CNG conversion will be performed at the Venchurs’ conversion facility in Adrian, Mich.

Visit www.venchursvehicles.com for more.

Freightliner Custom Chassis
Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation (FCCC), a subsidiary of Daimler Trucks North America LLC, has introduced its S2G chassis, a factory-installed liquid propane gas engine available in medium-duty trucks. The front-engine chassis utilizes a Freightliner M2 cab and has a GVWR of 33,000 pounds. Standard specs include an Allison 2300 automatic transmission with PTO provision.

The S2G’s 8-liter, 325-HP engine supplied by Powertrain Integration uses General Motors’ long block and other engine components. FCCC partnered with Powertrain Integration and CleanFUEL USA in the development of the S2G. A limited preproduction run of the S2G chassis is expected in the fourth quarter of 2012, with full production slated for the first quarter of 2013.

Visit www.freightlinerchassis.com for more.

Ram Truck
Ram Truck has introduced a factory-built CNG pickup. The Ram 2500 Heavy Duty CNG model is powered by the 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 and is equipped with both compressed natural gas tanks and an 8-gallon gasoline fuel tank. Canadian customers can opt for a 35-gallon gasoline tank. The CNG tanks provide a gasoline gallon equivalent of 18.2 gallons. If the CNG tanks are emptied, the vehicle will automatically switch to gasoline. CNG-only range is estimated to be 255 miles, while the backup supply of gasoline extends the range to 367 total miles.

The Ram 2500 CNG system uses a Hemi engine that has been modified to run on compressed natural gas as well as gasoline. Redesigned cylinder heads with specifically designed CNG-compatible valves and valve-seat materials allow the engine to burn both fuels. The engine also has a second, CNG-specific fuel rail and set of injectors, and a new powertrain control module that allows the Hemi to operate on either of the two fuel sources. In use the system is automatic. A small amount of gasoline is used during engine startup before the Ram CNG runs exclusively on compressed natural gas.

Visit www.ramtrucks.com for more.

General Motors
General Motors has announced details of its 2013 bi-fuel Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500HD extended cab pickup trucks. GM bi-fuel pickups are equipped with a CNG-capable Vortec 6.0L V-8 engine that transitions between CNG and gasoline fuel systems. Combined, the systems offer a range of more than 650 miles. The Silverado and Sierra will be available in standard and long box models, with either two- or four-wheel-drive systems.

Visit www.gmfleet.com for more.

Westport Innovations
Westport Innovations has announced that its Westport LD division’s WiNG Power System is being based on Ford’s new 6.2L hardened engine platform. Ford F-250 and F-350 pickups with the bi-fuel system run on natural gas or gasoline. WiNG Power Systems will be installed at the company’s manufacturing facility adjacent to the Ford Kentucky Truck Plant in Louisville.

Visit www.westport.com for more.

ELECTRIC

Motiv Power Systems
Motiv Power Systems has received a California Energy Commission grant of $1.16 million for an assembly line pilot run of four electric truck chassis in partnership with Detroit Chassis. The Motiv Electric Powertrain Control System (ePCS), which provides a 100-mile range, will be demonstrated in shuttle bus applications.

Motiv’s ePCS works with a wide range of batteries and motors. Through its intelligent software control algorithms, Motiv’s ePCS actively manages power flow between all electrical components in the vehicle. It also captures and wirelessly broadcasts data to the Motiv cloud for monitoring and analysis. Factors such as battery charge and vehicle status provide detailed real-time analytics to support fleet operators in preventive maintenance.

Visit www.motivps.com for more.

ALTe
ALTe Powertrain Technologies has installed its powertrain system in a second line of vehicles, the Ford Econoline E-350 platform. ALTe has already implemented conversions in Ford F-150 trucks. Road tests reveal that the E-350 cutaway chassis prototype can drive approximately 25 miles in an all-electric mode and then deliver nearly 15 mpg in a charge-sustained mode. These performance levels should continue to improve, ALTe noted, as it incorporates production level components and refines engineering algorithms. The company is delivering the E-350 prototype to its first potential fleet customer for evaluation and plans to build more prototypes for customer evaluations throughout the year. The company is targeting a spring 2013 product launch date for the U.S. market.

Visit www.altept.com for more.

Protean
Protean Electric is offering Protean Drive, an electric drive in-wheel motor system for existing light-duty vehicles. According to the company, the system can be easily integrated into a broad range of vehicles and can increase fuel economy by more than 30 percent depending on the size of the battery and the driving cycle.

Protean’s solution uses in-wheel motors that can deliver 81 kW (110 HP) and 590 pounds per feet, yet weigh only 68 pounds and are sized to fit within the space of a conventional 18- to 24-inch road wheel. Protean Drive regenerative braking capabilities allow up to 85 percent of the available kinetic energy to be recovered during braking. The system can be used on front-, rear- or four-wheel-drive vehicles that run on gas, diesel or other gaseous fuels such as CNG.

Visit www.proteanelectric.com for more.

VIA Motors
VIA Motors has announced it will collaborate with telecom provider Verizon to develop plug-in electric work vehicles using VIA’s proprietary extended-range electric vehicle (eREV) technology. eREV vehicles have up to 40 miles of all-electric range using lithium-ion batteries and the capability to drive unlimited additional miles using VIA’s onboard electric generator or range extender. In independent testing, VIA’s eREV pickup trucks have demonstrated up to 100 miles per gallon in typical fleet driving, according to the company. In addition, Verizon anticipates utilizing the onboard generator and power export option to power work tools or even provide power to its network in an emergency.

Visit www.viamotors.com for more.

ENGINES

Daimler Certifies Complete Vehicle Lineup
Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA) has announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has certified its complete portfolio of model year 2013 on-highway, vocational and medium-duty vehicles as fully compliant with the new greenhouse gas 2014 (GHG14) regulations. DTNA’s GHG14 compliance has been achieved one full year ahead of the mandate for certification by the EPA and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s program to reduce heavy- and medium-duty truck greenhouse gas emissions.

Visit www.daimler-trucksnorthamerica.com for more.

Hino Trucks Honored at National Biodiesel Conference
Hino Trucks has been recognized by the National Biodiesel Board with the 2012 Eye on Biodiesel Impact Award. The company was nominated for the award for supporting the use of B20 biodiesel blends and for becoming the first manufacturer to support the use of B20 biodiesel blends in a hybrid-electric truck, as well as in its complete product line of Class 6 and 7 trucks.

All 2011 and later model conventional trucks powered by Hino’s proprietary J-Series engines are approved to use B20 biodiesel blends that contain biofuel blend stock (B100) compliant to ASTM D6751, and blended fuel compliant to ASTM D975. B20 biodiesel meeting these standards is also approved for use in Hino’s newly announced diesel and diesel-electric hybrid cabovers due to enter the market this summer.

Visit www.hino.com for more.

Green-Fleets-Smith-Electric-Web

Growing Interest

Featuring a larger expo hall where a wide range of vehicle systems in or nearing production for electric, plug-in hybrid, hybrid electric, hydraulic hybrid and work-site electrification were on display, the newly renamed Hybrid, Electric and Advanced Truck Users Forum (HTUF) held its annual meeting in Baltimore this past fall. The 2011 HTUF conference also had very significant participation from hybrid and electric truck manufacturers and suppliers, as well as fleets.

Utility Working Group
The HTUF Hybrid Utility Truck Working Group, consisting of more than 20 large fleets focusing on platforms for the utility industry and related uses, is now actively working on Class 4 and 5 applications and is reviewing plug-in hybrid requirements. This group is credited with fostering the launch of Class 6 and 7 commercial hybrid trucks from several manufacturers and has as parts of its current focus aerial lift trouble or “bucket” trucks in the medium- and heavy-duty weight range.

For the development of Class 4 and 5 hybrid work trucks, the working group is committed to developing preproduction vehicles for field evaluation. On its list of key performance parameters that will form the basis for vehicle specifications are:

• Reliability and durability that meet or exceed baseline vehicles
• Fuel economy improvement of 50 percent over baseline vehicles
• Payload loss of a maximum 500 pounds
• Engine-off power or idling for two to three hours at work sites
• Acceleration rate of a loaded unit that meets or exceeds baseline vehicles
• Startability of 15 percent at 20 mph
• Body and boom that are interchangeable with baseline trucks
• Gradeability of 15 to 30 percent at GVWR
• Top speed of 65 to 75 mph
• Fuel preference for diesel
• Engine-off electric drive or “Creep Mode” available up to 20 mph
• Variable shift points and RPM settings for different applications
• Exportable power of 3.5 kW single phase that meets industry standards
• Towing ability of 1,000 pounds
• In-cab display for driver feedback

Telecom Working Group
The HTUF Telecom Working Group released a request for information to OEMs and suppliers for Class 2 to 4 hybrid or ePTO trucks used in trouble response, spooling/splicing or light aerial applications. Respondents met with the working group at the recent conference and had the opportunity to ask direct questions of telecom companies. Vehicle specifications and key performance parameters are being refined and plans call for demonstration trucks to be available starting in late 2012.

HTUF is a national user-driven program to speed the commercialization of medium- and heavy-duty hybrid and high-efficiency technologies. It is operated by CALSTART in partnership with the U.S. Army’s National Automotive Center, with project support from the Hewlett Foundation and the Department of Energy. Visit www.htuf.org for more.

Electric Vehicles
CALSTART’s E-Truck Task Force (E-TTF) also met during the HTUF 2011 National Conference. The goal of the E-TTF is to speed and support effective electric truck production. The key recommendations of the task force are as follows:

• Call on industry to institute a battery-leasing model, link sales expansion to adequate parts and support networks, and increase quality control.
• Maintain or increase research and development for these technologies.
• Seek support incentives for incremental costs.
• Encourage fleets to require a service turnaround minimum before purchase.
• Create a commercial electric truck charge rate and eliminate/reduce demand charges.
• Create a clearinghouse for data-sharing on e-trucks.

To address the need for better guidance on building a business case for e-trucks, the task force developed an “E-Truck Business Case Calculator” that illustrates the best applications and ways to use an electric truck to recoup the initial purchase investment.

To help e-truck fleets understand their options, trade-offs and costs when setting up an EV charging infrastructure, the E-TTF created an infrastructure planning template based on fleet size. The template addresses power requirements, cost estimates, site considerations and availability of subsidies.

The E-TTF recommendations are now being used as an action plan for industry, fleet and policy activities. After receiving feedback on the E-TTF’s findings and proposed recommendations, CALSTART will publish this information. Visit www.calstart.org/Projects/E-Truck-Project.aspx for more.

EEI Guidebook
Edison Electric Institute (EEI) has released a guidebook to help utilities prepare for new electric cars and trucks. The report, “The Utility Guide to Plug-In Electric Vehicle Readiness,” acts as a road map for electric utilities to get the most benefit from this innovative technology.

The EEI guide focuses on the four areas that every electric utility will need to address to make sure they are ready for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) to plug into their service area:

• Getting the utility up to speed – The structure and organizational changes that a utility will need to address, as well as the value of adding PEVs to their fleets.
Enhancing the customer experience – The educational topics and communication channels that will help utilities get their PEV-owning customers up to speed.
• Key passengers to include – The guide offers advice on engaging key third parties such as state regulators; federal, state and local governments; and additional stakeholder collaborations.
• Plugging into the grid – This section looks at how much power PEVs use, ensuring grid and distribution system readiness; helping customers plug in; and streamlining the charging station installation process.

To download a copy, visit www.eei.org/newsroom/energynews/Pages/20111115.aspx.

Smith Electric Vehicles Expands Production
Smith Electric Vehicles Corp. has announced it will expand its U.S. operations in 2012 by adding a manufacturing facility in New York to build the zero-emission Newton, its all-electric medium-duty vehicle.

The Newton is offered as a chassis cab that can be configured for use in utility operations. The vehicle is offered in a GVW range from 16,500 to 26,400 pounds and in 154-, 177- and 201-inch wheelbases. The Newton has a range of up to 150 miles.

The new facility, Smith’s second U.S. manufacturing, sales and service center, will join existing operations in Kansas City, Mo. The first Newton vehicles are planned for production in New York in the second half of 2012. Smith’s investment in its new plant is being augmented by city and state incentives of approximately $11 million.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has also announced the development of a federally funded, multiyear commercial electric vehicle buyer incentive program to accelerate adoption and allow for fleet conversion throughout New York. The New York State Department of Transportation has committed $10 million in federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funding for the first year, which will be offered in the form of vouchers of up to $20,000 per vehicle. The program will be managed by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and will offer voucher incentives to the purchasers of any qualified all-electric vehicle over 10,000 pounds GVW regardless of manufacturer. Visit www.smithelectric.com for more.

Protean Electric Projects Retrofit Market Growth
An all-new retrofit market will grow to a half-million vehicles by 2020, according to Protean Electric, which has developed an in-wheel motor electric drive system for light-duty vehicles. “Rising operating costs, shrinking budgets and green mandates are hard to balance when your fleet still has a job to do every day,” said Ken Stewart, Protean’s vice president of sales and marketing. “The time is right for a system that can add the benefits of this technology to light-duty vehicles that are already in service.”

The vast majority of this new retrofit market will come from converting light-duty government and commercial fleets. The Protean Drive in-wheel solution, which can be integrated into a broad range of vehicles, uses motors that can be fitted to conventional rear axles and installed in the space behind a wheel to produce up to 110 HP. Each motor has its own self-contained inverter controller. Visit www.proteanelectric.com for more.

PG&E Helps Unveil VIA Motors eREV
Pacific Gas and Electric Company joined VIA Motors in unveiling the first extended-range electric pickup truck for utilities. The utility partnered with VIA in 2008 to develop the trucks, called extended-range electric vehicles or eREVs, and already operates two of the trucks.

The VIA Motors eREV powertrain, powered by Symetron SmartDrive, was designed to work in light-duty trucks from GM, Ford and Dodge. An extended-range electric work truck comes with an optional onboard inverter that can be used in place of a tow-behind generator. The eREV trucks run the first 40 miles solely on electricity before switching to gasoline. For electric utilities, the trucks potentially can provide on-site power using a 15 kW capacity inverter.

In addition to the full-size pickup, VIA will offer a four-wheel drive SUV and a three-quarter-ton cargo van. The company has begun taking orders for its extended range electric pickup. Production is scheduled to begin in 2012. Visit www.viamotors.com for more.

Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation and Enova Partner to Unveil Green for Free Program
Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation (FCCC) and Enova, a developer of hybrid-electric and all-electric drive systems and drive system components, have launched a program to make electric vehicles more accessible to fleets.

The Green for Free program allows fleets to purchase all-electric vehicles for the cost of a diesel-powered commercial vehicle. The savings fleets incur from the reduced maintenance and fuel savings of the electric vehicles are then used over a period of time to cover the incremental expense of the technology. FCCC and Enova plan to deploy a total of 3,000 alternative-fuel vehicles within a two-year time frame beginning no later than the third quarter of 2012 as a result of the Green for Free program.

The Green for Free program will utilize the FCCC All-Electric Walk-in Van chassis powered by the Enova drive system. Enova and FCCC developed an integration method for both new and retrofit applications. FCCC’s all-electric chassis is built upon the FCCC MT-45 chassis with a GVWR of 14,000 to 19,500 pounds. Visit www.freightlinerchassis.com and www.enovasystems.com for more.

Propane
Trucks fueled by propane autogas, coupled with the cleaner-burning properties of propane, can decrease maintenance costs and extend engine life, according to the Propane Education & Research Council. Vehicles fueled by propane autogas, the most widely used alternative fuel, emit up to 12 percent less carbon dioxide, about 20 percent less nitrogen oxide and up to 60 percent less carbon monoxide than gasoline‐powered vehicles. More than 270,000 vehicles in the United States run on propane autogas, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Light- and medium-duty trucks fueled by propane autogas are available from industry-leading manufacturers, including Ford Motor Company, through collaboration with ROUSH CleanTech and General Motors, and through collaboration with CleanFUEL USA. The North American market for vehicles fueled by propane autogas is gaining momentum as more fleet managers become aware of the environmental and economic advantages.

Southern California’s City of Cypress is using ROUSH CleanTech propane autogas vehicles. The city added two Ford F-250 pickups fueled by the alternative fuel. “The City of Cypress is always looking for opportunities to put green vehicles in our fleet, and it’s important to move toward greener fleets when possible,” said Doug Dancs, the city’s director of public works. “Plus, the choice for propane was an easy one since we have had a propane fueling station in place since the early 1980s.”

King County, Wash., is also using vehicles that operate on propane autogas. Its fleet now includes seven Ford F-250s, one Ford F-350 extended cab pickup and one Ford E-250 cargo van with ROUSH CleanTech systems. “Public fleets in particular have a responsibility to take the lead and take steps to achieve significant greenhouse gas reductions within their own fleets,” said Robert Toppen, King County Department of Transportation equipment supervisor.

Visit www.autogasusa.org, www.roushcleantech.com and www.cleanfuelusa.com for more.

Compressed Natural Gas
Compressed natural gas (CNG) is an abundant domestic alternative fuel that offers significant advantages over gasoline. CNG’s per-gallon equivalent is 30 percent less expensive. In many areas of the country there is already infrastructure in place to effectively operate natural gas vehicles and more public-access fueling stations are becoming available. Another major advantage of CNG is 25 percent fewer CO2 emissions than standard gasoline-powered engines.

Strategic Partnership to Produce Natural Gas Vehicles
Leggett & Platt Commercial Vehicle Products (L&P CVP) has partnered with Landi Renzo USA to implement alternative fuel systems using CNG. L&P CVP will install Landi Renzo’s CNG fuel system at its Ford ship-thru facility in Elyria, Ohio, and will offer three- and four-tank options for installation on Ford’s E-250 and E-350 Cargo and Passenger vans. The 21 and 27 gasoline-gallon-equivalent tanks are part of a system that complies with Federal Motor Vehicles Safety Standards and Regulations, is certified by the EPA and is 50-state compliant through CARB. Visit www.leggettcvp.com and www.landiusa.com for more.

IMPCO Receives CARB Certification
IMPCO Automotive, a business unit of Fuel System Solutions Inc., has received certification by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) for its CNG fuel systems on several Ford and General Motors vehicles. Included are:

• Ford E-150/250 and 250 Econoline vans with the 5.4-liter V8 engines
• Ford E-450 Econoline cutaway cab chassis with the 6.8-liter 2v V8 engines
• Ford F-450/550 Super Duty trucks with the 6.8-liter 3v V8 engines
• General Motors 2500/3500 Express/Savana vans with the 4.8-liter and 6.0-liter V8 engines
• General Motors 4.8-liter V8 engine for heavy-duty applications – 10,001 to 14,000 pounds GVW
• General Motors 6.0-liter V8 engine for heavy-duty applications over 14,000 pounds GVW

Achieving CARB certification is especially important because several states have either adopted or are in the process of adopting California’s strict emissions standards. These states include New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, Maryland and Florida. IMPCO previously received certification from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for these vehicles.

Now fielding IMPCO-powered vehicles is the City of Chicago, which has ordered up to 40 CNG-powered Chevrolet Express vans and as many as 40 CNG-powered Chevrolet Silverado pickup trucks. The dedicated CNG fuel systems will be installed on the Chevrolet Express vans at IMPCO Automotive’s alternative fuels conversion plant in Union City, Ind. The fuel systems for the trucks will be installed by IMPCO Automotive’s certified installation partner, Auto Truck Group, in Bartlett, Ill. Visit www.impcoautomotive.com for more.

Daimler Trucks North America Produces 1,000th Natural Gas Truck
Daimler Trucks North America, parent company of Freightliner Trucks, turned over the key to its 1,000th natural gas truck. Freightliner’s natural gas vehicles, including the M2 112 and 114SD, are powered by the Cummins Westport ISL G 8.9-liter engine, the only factory-built, dedicated natural gas engine available in the commercial vehicle market. These factory-installed and warranty-covered CNG tanks come in 60 diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) and 75 DGE configurations.

Freightliner Trucks has also announced that DeKalb County, Ga., has ordered 24 Freightliner Business Class M2 112 CNG trucks. DeKalb County will power the new trucks using its methane gas-to-energy process. The program, which was launched in 2011, converts landfill waste to useable natural gas. By converting the waste to energy, DeKalb County produces enough electricity to run 2,500 homes and will produce enough natural gas to run 600 trucks. To support the gas-to-energy program, DeKalb County is also building two fueling stations. Visit www.freightlinertrucks.com for more.

Hybrids

Hybrid Systems Achieve 200 Million Miles of Service
Eaton Corporation has announced that that customers of its hybrid systems have collectively accumulated more than 200 million miles of service, reducing diesel fuel consumption by 8 million gallons and harmful emissions by 80,000 metric tons. More than 5,500 of Eaton’s hybrid systems are in use today worldwide on trucks and buses. In addition to hybrid electric systems, Eaton began commercial production of its hybrid hydraulic system known as Eaton Hydraulic Launch Assist or Eaton HLA in the fall of 2010.

Eaton has also announced a program that lowers the service replacement cost for its hybrid power systems electronics carriers (PECs) and said it will offer two auxiliary power generator (APG) options for its hybrid electric power systems.

“We are now entering the period when the early adopters of hybrid technology are beginning to require service of the hybrid power batteries outside the factory warranty period,” said Gerard Devito, director of engineering, Eaton Hybrid Power Systems Division. “We are committed to helping fleets receive real value in running cleaner, greener fleets by continuing to lower the overall cost of ownership for hybrid systems and provide a positive return on investment.”

The new program significantly lowers the purchase price of PECs by up to half for utility applications. A standard aftermarket warranty of one year on parts and labor applies, with a two-year extended protection plan available at an additional cost. Starting in October 2011, the program became available through dealerships that elect to participate in this program and are authorized to service Eaton Hybrid Power Systems.

In addition to the PEC service replacement program, Eaton has announced it will offer two APG options in 2012 that will allow fleets to run vital equipment from the vehicle without requiring the engine to idle for power generation. The APG options will meet the power needs for customers using 115-volt single-phase tools and 208-volt three-phase loads. Visit www.eaton.com/hybrid for more.

BAE Unveils Scalable Hybrid Solution
The new BAE Systems HybriDrive family of heavy-duty hybrid electric propulsion systems is scalable to meet a wide range of truck platforms, vocations and duty cycles, including those for hybrid utility trucks. HybriDrive Parallel is based on a single electric machine integrated with the engine and the transmission on medium- to heavy-duty trucks.
www.baesystems.com

International DuraStar
The International DuraStar Hybrid, a diesel hybrid electric medium-duty truck is available with a choice of engines. Included are the MaxxForce 7 in ratings from 220 to 300 HP and 560 to 660 lbs./ft. of torque; the MaxxForce DT with automatic and manual driveline options and eight ratings from 215 to 300 HP and 560 to 860 lbs./ft. of torque; and the MaxxForce 9, also with a full range of automatic and manual driveline options and ratings up to 350 HP.

International’s hybrid vehicle is also equipped with the company’s Diamond Logic Electrical System, which integrates body equipment and the hybrid powertrain as a single piece of equipment. The programmable system features self-calibrating gauges that provide an audible alarm and visible LED indication when displaying a value out of normal operating range. Onboard diagnostics monitor electrical modules and capture diagnostic faults, and trouble codes are stored and displayed on the instrument panel’s built-in LCD screen. The International DuraStar Hybrid can also be equipped with the OEM’s AWARE vehicle intelligence system to allow for real-time data collection, reporting and analysis. Visit www.internationaltrucks.com for more.

XL Hybrids Conversion Systems
A hybrid conversion that transforms new or existing Class 1 through 3 vehicles into hybrid electric units is being readied for sale in 2012 by XL Hybrids. Designed for cargo, utility and shuttle vans and pickup trucks, the system has been undergoing pilot trials with select customers. XL Hybrids adds an electric motor, a lithium-ion battery pack and control software to the vehicle without making significant modifications to the engine or transmission. The parallel hybrid system can be installed as a retrofit on existing vehicles through a network of installation partners or as an upfit onto a new vehicle before delivery from a dealer. Visit www.xlhybrids.com for more.

eaton-2-web

Green Fleet Technologies

Eaton
The developer and manufacturer of hybrid power systems for commercial vehicles, Eaton’s parallel hybrid systems are already in use in many utility fleets. Available through truck manufacturers, the systems include the electric hybrid solution featuring an engine-off power-takeoff (ePTO), and an optional auxiliary power generator and AC power panel for utility, telecom and municipal operations using medium-duty bucket trucks.

The Eaton electric hybrid power system maintains the vehicle’s conventional drivetrain and blends engine torque with electric torque. The system recovers power normally lost during braking and stores the energy in batteries. It can provide ePTO and work site capability for operations needing hydraulic and electric power on job sites. The system is coupled with the vehicle’s engine and Eaton’s UltraShift automated manual transmission and clutch. Between the output side of the clutch and the transmission, the system includes an electric motor/generator that is connected to a power inverter and lithium-ion batteries, and is controlled with an electronic control module.

Eaton also offers its Hydraulic Launch Assist (HLA) hydraulic hybrid system. During regeneration with the HLA system, the vehicle’s kinetic energy that is normally lost during braking is captured and used to drive a pump, which transfers hydraulic fluid from a low-pressure reservoir to a high-pressure accumulator.

As the fluid pumps into the accumulator, it compresses nitrogen gas and pressurizes the system. The regenerative braking captures about 70 percent of the kinetic energy produced during braking. For acceleration, the fluid in the high-pressure accumulator is released to drive the system’s motor, which propels the vehicle by transmitting torque to the driveshaft.

The Eaton HLA system has two different operating modes: economy and performance. In economy mode, the energy stored in the accumulator during braking is used to initially accelerate the vehicle. Once the accumulator has emptied, the engine will begin to perform the acceleration. In performance mode, acceleration is created by both the energy stored in the accumulator and the engine. Once the accumulator has emptied, the engine is completely responsible for acceleration.

Visit www.eaton.com for more information.

allison-webAllison
Working with Delphi Automotive and Remy International, Allison has developed a hybrid propulsion system for medium-duty trucks. The new technology combines an Allison 3000 Series automatic transmission, Remy International’s High Voltage Hairpin (HVH) electric motor-generator, and Delphi Automotive’s lithium-ion energy storage system and transmission control module.

The Allison Hybrid, according to the company, combines the benefits of the three suppliers’ systems to offer better fuel economy. Among the fuel-saving features of the Allison automatic is the manufacturer’s torque converter technology that is designed to provide for full power shifts, using engine power more efficiently and consuming less fuel. The Remy HVH electric motor-generator, Allison also notes, is a compact design that captures more braking energy while using less energy to generate propulsion power and torque.

Tailored to meet the specific needs of any medium-duty truck application, the Allison Hybrid utilizes Delphi’s scalable lithium-ion energy storage system. The Delphi modular design also includes a transmission control module with the computing capability, memory and processing speed to control the entire hybrid system.

Visit www.allisontransmission.com for more information.

alte-webALTe Powertrain Technologies
Range-extended electric powertrains for light- and medium-duty vehicles up to 26,000 pounds GVW will be available from ALTe initially through a nationwide network of conversion facilities. Eventually, ALTe expects to sell and license its technology to OEMs.

The major components of the ALTe powertrain include a 20 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, a four-cylinder engine, electric drive motors, a generator, a proprietary hybrid controller unit and HVAC modules. The powertrain is projected to provide an initial 30 miles of driving in an all-electric mode, powered directly from the lithium-ion battery pack. The vehicle can then drive an estimated additional 275 miles in a charge-sustained mode before the vehicle would need to be either plugged in or refueled. The battery pack can be charged within an eight-hour time frame from a 110-volt outlet or in about four hours from a 220-volt outlet.

ALTe, a shortened version of the words “alternative energy,” recently announced a contract with Remy to supply HVH 250 electric motors that will act as onboard generators to recharge batteries and deliver electric drivetrain traction power for ALTe’s powertrain conversions. A joint venture with Inmatech Inc. will produce hybrid electric storage devices composed of batteries, supercapacitors and control electronics. An agreement between ALTe and Manheim will provide installation of its powertrains in vehicles at Manheim locations.

Visit www.altellc.com for more information.

azure-dynamics-2-webAzure Dynamics
The Balance Hybrid Electric vehicle from Azure Dynamics is built on a Ford E-450 commercial stripped or cutaway chassis with a modified drivetrain and electronic controls system. The system’s traction motor, in parallel with the unit’s Ford 5.4-liter EFI FFV gasoline V8 engine and automatic transmission, propels the vehicle. The traction motor assists acceleration and captures energy during regenerative braking events. This energy is stored in the energy storage system (ESS). When the vehicle comes to a stop, the engine will shut off and the electric power assist system is enabled to maintain power steering, power brakes and 12-volt charging.

The Azure system also has an integrated starter generator mounted to the front of the engine, which is used to provide quick restarts of the engine when accelerating from a stop. It also generates power to charge the ESS. The high-voltage system is self-contained and does not have to be plugged in to an external power source for charging.

Visit www.azuredynamics.com for more information.

odyne-webOdyne Systems, LLC
The Odyne hybrid propulsion system for medium- and heavy-duty work trucks with extended stationary PTO job site functions – such as bucket trucks, digger derricks and cranes – can be applied to most new chassis or as a retrofit. The Odyne plug-in hybrid drive system uses a Remy HVH 250 electric motor, and provides 50-HP launch assist capability, regenerative braking or plug-in charging, and electrical energy storage to power air conditioning and cab heaters while the engine is off. Exportable power up to 7000W is available from the system’s 14 kWh or 28 kWh lithium-ion battery pack.

The Odyne hybrid system is compatible with most chassis over 14,000 pounds GVW and does not require drivetrain modifications. The system’s integration is simplified through the power takeoff (PTO) and propulsion components are placed within chassis frame rails for ease of installation. Battery packs can be placed in a variety of locations

Visit www.odyne.com for more information.

quantum-3-webQuantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc.
Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies offers a plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) conversion for Ford F-150 model pickup trucks. Pilot vehicles will be available for fleet testing in the fourth quarter of 2011. Production at the manufacturer’s Lake Forest, Calif., facility is scheduled to begin in the third quarter of 2012. Base vehicles shipped to the facility are partially disassembled, the new drive system is installed and tested, and the vehicle is reassembled and shipped to the customer.

The Quantum PHEV is powered by the company’s F-Drive hybrid drive system, developed specifically for Ford F-150 4×4 Regular and SuperCab models with a 145-inch wheelbase. The system provides a 35-mile electric-only range, shifting to hybrid electric mode for a total range of more than 400 miles. The F-Drive has been integrated in the F-150 pickup truck to ensure there is no loss of cab or cargo space, and to maintain full ground clearance. F-150 models with the Quantum system have a payload capacity up to 900 pounds and towing capacity up to 5,800 pounds. The 150 kW parallel hybrid drive system can be recharged using 110- or 220-volt power.

Quantum provides a five-year/75,000-mile limited warranty on the drive system. The company also trains fleet maintenance personnel on servicing the system and has an on-call team available to support customer fleet maintenance departments.

Visit www.qtww.com for more information.

green-fleets-2-web

Changing Landscape

The landscape for utility fleets is changing again. Earlier this year, the first-ever fuel efficiency and carbon rules for trucks were put in place. Following the process used for light-duty vehicles, the new rules set standards for all on-highway vehicles with GVW ratings above 8,500 pounds. The new rules that will take effect include U.S. Environmental Protection Agency greenhouse gas regulations beginning with 2014 model year vehicles and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration fuel consumption regulations that begin with the 2016 model year.

Under these new regulations, fuel efficiency will rise and carbon emissions will go down for all vehicle classes, including tractors, Class 3 to 8 vocational work trucks, and heavy-duty pickups and vans. Manufacturers are expected to meet the new regulations with both engine and full vehicle technology approaches.

The 2011 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference, held in Williamsburg, Va., featured a series of presentations on “Focused Strategies for Future Success” by industry experts, manufacturers and fleets. Of interest to the fleet managers in attendance were several presentations on green fleet issues by industry and government stakeholders.

Status and Trends of Green Tech and Fuels in Commercial Vehicles
Bill Van Amburg
Senior Vice President, CALSTART

“Nearly 70 percent of oil used in the U.S. goes to transportation,” Van Amburg said. “To address energy security, transportation must be a top focus. There are two main ways to achieve reductions in imported oil, and we need both. We have to use less fuel to do the same work and switch to nonpetroleum sources.”

To make a business case for alternative fuel-powered commercial vehicles, Van Amburg said, fuel cost issues need to be addressed. “The medium- and heavy-duty hybrid business case improves substantially for fuel prices above $3 per gallon,” he said. “Natural gas already has a substantial price advantage, while other alternative fuels show benefits. In addition, electric trucks are gaining interest as a hedge against fuel price fluctuations because electricity prices are much more stable.”

Commercial plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) work trucks show potential because their extra energy storage boosts idle time reduction during work site engine-off operations, Van Amburg noted. “Diesel fuel costs are causing a rapid review of the potential business case for these vehicles,” he said, “but energy storage costs are still high. Still, there is growing interest from fleets if fuel savings are not derived entirely from driving cycles.”

Van Amburg was referring to plug-in body systems from various manufacturers that allow stored energy to be used to operate aerials and tools at the work site. These solutions are generally separate from and do not change conventional drivelines, but still offer potential fuel saving and idle reduction benefits.

Dual-mode hybrids, which are already in use in transit operations, are one technology under development for trucks. In particular, Van Amburg pointed out that Meritor and Navistar are testing an advanced dual-mode hybrid design that provides electric drive capability at lower speeds and a blended power mode at higher speeds. Eaton is also testing a dual-mode hybrid that offers a zero emissions short-range, low-speed driving capability.

Also noted in Van Amburg’s presentation were the expanding choices for natural gas engines in medium- and heavy-duty trucks that showcase the re-emergence of natural gas as a viable fuel option.

“Electric trucks are a key emerging segment,” Van Amburg pointed out. As a result, CALSTART has created an e-truck task force of users and manufacturers to identify market and technology barriers, such as charging issues. Fleet needs are also on the group’s agenda, including determining best duty cycles such as those for high-idle work site applications of PTO-driven components and aerial devices, and quantifying benefits to support and validate a business case for this technology.

“The foundation has been set,” Van Amburg stated. “Advanced low-emitting, high-efficiency technologies are now emerging and are in early production. We are entering a 20-year period of significant technology and fuel change and pressures for greater efficiency and reduced emissions, but a support framework is needed to help industry meet challenges.”

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles
Mark Kosowski
Program Manager, PHEV Medium-Duty Truck, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

A PHEV, Kosowski explained, is similar to a hybrid truck except that it incorporates an extra 10- to 30-kWh battery that can be charged through an interface to the electrical grid. This stored energy improves fuel economy and reduces emissions by powering functions normally handled by the engine.

Kosowski defined three typical parallel hybrid architectures that can be used in PHEVs:

Pre-transmission hybrids include a pump, battery, inverter and charger. “This is the most capable architecture because the motor and engine can drive the wheels through the transmission, and the motor can drive the PTO without using the engine by opening the clutch,” Kosowski said. “This is a higher cost solution because the transmission needs to be modified.”

Post-transmission hybrids use a battery. “This is a less expensive solution because the transmission does not need to be modified,” Kosowski said. “While the motor in this architecture can drive the PTO without using the engine, the motor can only be operated at transmission output speed.”

PTO-driven hybrids incorporate a pump, battery, inverter and charger. “In this architecture the motor can drive wheels through the transmission and can drive the PTO without the engine,” Kosowski said. “This is also less expensive because the transmission does not need to be modified; however, the motor and engine torque operate in parallel in this solution.”

Fleet readiness for a PHEV charging infrastructure was also on Kosowski’s agenda. For fleets developing charging solutions, he referenced the National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 625, which describes charging safety issues, and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Recommended Practice J1772 for charging systems.

PHEV charging systems were detailed by Kosowski as well. A Level 1 AC 120-volt charging system uses a cord set with one end that has a standard plug arrangement that can interface to any electric vehicle as defined by SAE J1772 . The other end is plugged into a typical 120-volt AC outlet. The cord set is usually stored in the vehicle. Charge time is dependent on the vehicle’s battery size and can range from eight to 20 hours.

Level 2 AC 208/240V charging systems also use a cord set with one end that has a standard plug arrangement that can interface to any electric vehicle as defined by SAE J1772, the same as the 120V interface. The other end is permanently connected to the electrical grid.

“It is recommended that Level 1 charging have a dedicated circuit as chargers are sized to use the maximum capacity of the circuit [80 percent of breaker rating],” Kosowski explained. “In particular, a Level 1, 15-amp charger loads the circuit at 12 amps and a Level 1, 20-amp charger loads the circuit at 16 amps. Breaker tripping is likely if other loads share the circuit. Level 2 chargers require a dedicated circuit [per NEC] with controlled connect/disconnect [high current/voltage] capability, and for safety the connection to the premise wiring is not cycled, meaning the connection is made and broken at the vehicle.”

Kosowski also discussed the EPRI/TVA Smart Station project located at EPRI’s Knoxville lab. The facility, he related, is helping develop best practices and provide public education, and will expand on lessons learned in future site designs.

EPRI serves as the hub of collaboration in this effort through its Infrastructure Working Council, which brings stakeholders together four times a year and works to bridge the gap between utilities, connector and charging system manufacturers, and automakers, among others.

“Our vision,” Kosowski concluded, “is that by 2015 all plug-in vehicles can communicate to the smart grid where charging is intelligently controlled. Smart charging is lower in cost and more convenient for vehicle operators, and can minimize the impact on the electric infrastructure.”

Acquisition and Funding Strategies
Mark Smith
Vehicle Technologies Deployment Manager, National Clean Cities Program, U.S. Department of Energy

“The primary focus of DOE’s Clean Cities Vehicle Technology Program is to achieve petroleum reduction by implementing programs that follow research and development,” Smith stated. “Since 1993, we have helped cut petroleum use by nearly 3 billion gallons annually. Currently, there are over 700,000 alternative fuel vehicles on the road and 7,000 alternative fueling stations, more than 70 percent of them influenced by Clean Cities programs.”

Clean Cities includes more than 100 coalitions serving 78 percent of the U.S. population. The coalitions involve thousands of stakeholders from businesses, city and state governments, transportation industry, community organizations and fuel providers.

Deployment efforts that Smith outlined include local community and coalition partnerships with direct support for Clean Cities activities, public events, training for coalitions and community leaders, local project coordination and strategic planning assistance. In addition, the DOE program provides consumer information, outreach and education in the form of fuel economy guides, the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, other Web-based consumer tools, publications, workshops, and targeted workforce and end-user education.

Technical and problem-solving assistance is available from Clean Cities as well, covering things such as addressing market barriers, safety issues and technology shortfalls. The program also offers financial assistance by providing funding in the form of competitive awards to facilitate infrastructure development and vehicle deployment projects.

Clean Cities, Smith pointed out, is working with the National Clean Fleets Partnership “to deploy over 10,000 alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also,” he added, “over 1,250 alternative fuel and electric vehicle charging stations will be built or upgraded. An enhanced locator and mapping service for more than 500 new electric vehicle charging locations is planned, and we are working on funding opportunities for all of our programs.

“The goal,” Smith concluded, “is to reduce petroleum use by 40 million gallons per year in the near term and by 2.5 billion gallons annually by 2020.”

Resources
Clean Cities: www.cleancities.energy.gov
Federal Grants: www.grants.gov
Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center: www.afdc.energy.gov
Fuel Economy Guide: www.fueleconomy.gov
Clean Cities Coalition Contacts: www.afdc.energy.gov/cleancities/progs/coordinators.php
Electric Power Research Institute: www.epri.com
CALSTART (including the Hybrid Truck Users Forum): www.calstart.org

Fleet Reports
During the 2011 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference, fleet managers related their experience with hybrid vehicles.

Mike Allison
Director, Fleet Design and Technical Support
Duke Energy

Duke Energy’s 2009 Freightliner hybrid trucks are still receiving good acceptance reports from operators, Allison noted. “Savings are still driven by application and job needs,” he said. “After approximately 40,000 miles of service, the most closely matched hybrids compared to baseline units have exhibited 25 percent better fuel economy, 23 percent less overall engine run time and 41 percent less overall engine idle time. For the hybrids, ePTO use is 76 percent of overall PTO operation time.”

Glenn Martin, CAFM
Fleet Maintenance Manager
Florida Power & Light

The hybrid portion of the Florida Power & Light fleet has increased from 24 units in 2006 to 364 units in 2010, Martin related. “Overall, the data indicates that hybrid vehicles are meeting or exceeding expectations on all fronts,” he said.

“With the hybrids in our fleet, fuel used from 2006 to 2010 decreased by 10 percent while our vehicle count increased by 136 units or 6 percent,” Martin reported. “In the same time period, annual miles driven increased by 2.3 percent and average MPG increased by 14 percent. In addition, maintenance costs for the hybrid fleet are trending significantly under the nonhybrid portion of the fleet and hybrid vehicle availability is trending above the nonhybrids.”

Dave Meisel
Director, Transportation Services
Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

With more than 2,600 alternative fuel vehicles, PG&E operates one of the largest high-efficiency vehicle utility fleets in the nation. Included are natural gas (CNG or LNG), biodiesel (B-20), electric (on- and off-road) and hybrid (HEV and PHEV) units.

Challenges do remain on several fronts, however. “Employee familiarity with the operation of and acceptance of the equipment are concerns,” Meisel said, “along with the availability of qualified technicians. For electric vehicles in particular, the charging infrastructure, including the speed of charging and the volume and location of charging stations, is still a challenge.

“The return on investment for some of these technologies is better than for others,” Meisel continued, “and performance varies significantly based on make, model and manufacturer, even among like technologies. Parts and service availability is also an ongoing challenge.”

Meisel noted that in some cases technology development is moving so fast that some regulatory agencies are behind, especially when it comes to incentives. “Government incentives are nice,” he stated, “but they haven’t changed the way we buy vehicles. Financing also continues to be a challenge.

“Fleets need to create a self-sustaining model,” Meisel added. “They need to understand the technology and its application, and conduct a full cost-benefit analysis. Determining accurate costs, useful service life and residual values are among the open issues.

“Greening the fleet makes sense from an environmental and economic standpoint,” Meisel concluded, “but there will not be any one fuel or technology that meets all of our needs. At PG&E we will be evaluating all the technology options as they become available.”

About the Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference
Organized and produced by a highly dedicated group of fleet managers, the Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference (EUFMC) features technical and management presentations, and an equipment exhibit built on the guidance of fleet professionals.

“This group of volunteers works for many months to determine what subjects will have the greatest interest to the fleet and supplier community,” said George Survant, director of fleet services at Florida Power & Light and the current EUFMC president. “Utility fleet managers have had to address a greater rate of change in the past decade than in the previous 40 years. EUFMC sorts through this large array of issues to help the fleet community and the entire industry focus on critical items, and make a difference by driving costs in a direction that is acceptable to customers and shareholders.”

The 59th EUFMC will be held June 3-6, 2012, at the Williamsburg Lodge and Conference Center in Williamsburg, Va. For more information, visit www.eufmc.com.

Green-Focused Facility
Altec Industries has announced plans for a green-focused facility in Dixon, Calif. The new plant will feature sustainable construction and exceed Title 24 energy and lighting codes. In addition, Altec plans to use the facility to expand the development and production of its Green Fleet utility vehicle product line.

Altec received guidance and support on the development of the new green-focused facility from two of its customers – Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and Southern California Edison. In addition, PG&E and Altec are partnering to develop innovative, technologically advanced Green Fleet utility vehicles, which will be produced at the new facility.

“Altec is committed to sustainable solutions,” said Lee Styslinger III, Altec chairman and CEO. “That commitment to sustainability is reflected not only in the products we build, but also in the facilities where we build them.”

Visit www.altec.com for more information.

peterbilt-hybrid

Green Fleets

Around the Industry
The National Clean Fleets Partnership, a Department of Energy (DOE) initiative, has set its sights on helping companies reduce diesel and gasoline use in their fleets by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels and other fuel-saving measures into their daily operations. Through the partnership, the DOE will assist in efforts to reduce fuel use and achieve greater efficiency and cost savings by offering specialized resources, technical expertise and support.

Part of the DOE Vehicle Technology Program’s “Clean Cities” initiative, the National Clean Fleets Partnership includes opportunities for technical assistance and collaboration, such as peer-to-peer information exchange, and access to expertise at DOE and national laboratories where related research and development initiatives are underway. Also possible is assistance in pursuing group purchasing so smaller companies realize the benefits of purchasing advanced technology vehicles.

The DOE has developed a wide range of technical tools to help companies navigate the world of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The collection includes cost calculators, interactive maps, customizable database searches, mobile applications and other vital information.

Utilimarc and CALSTART have joined forces to provide fleets with a range of valuable resources and experience about light- and medium-duty vehicles powered by alternative fuel. CALSTART, which is known for its Hybrid Truck Users Forum (HTUF), brings to bear its expertise to guide fleets in selecting and implementing new technology and measuring its benefits. Utilimarc’s benchmarking data plays a critical role in assessment, monitoring and ROI calculation, ensuring a reliable comparison of industry-specific metrics with an emphasis on tracking alternative fuel vehicles.

Regulations mandating environmental protection practices are requiring fleet managers to implement new programs. These rules, which cover a wide variety of topics, include the following:
• U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules covering hazardous wastes defined and regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, known as RCRA (“Rick-Rah”), including recycling and pollution prevention options
• Federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations and state UST programs approved by the EPA that are allowed to operate in lieu of the federal program and may have more stringent regulations than the federal requirements
• Safe fuel-handling regulations designed to prevent accidental spills and overfills
• RCRA, Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act requirements that may pertain to vehicle painting
• Refrigeration service activities regulated under the Clean Air Act
• Regulatory requirements for pollutant discharge and storm water runoff systems
• Requirements for hazmat incident reporting

GreenTruck (www.greentruck.com), a consolidated source of information about environmental regulations, is provided by American Trucking Associations and the Transportation Environmental Resource Center. The site details EPA programs for oil spill prevention and response, and hazmat incident reporting. Also covered are federal and state underground storage tank (UST) regulations, safe fuel-handling regulations, hazardous waste definitions, refrigeration service activities regulated under the Clean Air Act and requirements that may pertain to vehicle painting. GreenTruck also provides details on the EPA’s National Environmental Performance Track program, which rewards companies that exceed minimum regulatory requirements and take extra steps to reduce and prevent pollution.

On the Road
Fleet managers continue to learn more about alternative fuel-powered vehicles. During the 2010 Electric Utility Fleet Managers Conference (EUFMC), three executives described their experiences.

Duke Energy has been operating groups of 2006- and 2009-model hybrid trucks, reported Mike Allison, director of fleet design and technical support. The hybrids and baseline vehicles in the fleet were fitted with data capture systems to compare operating information. “For the most closely matched vehicles, both driven approximately 22,000 miles,” he said, “we learned that the hybrid unit used 25 percent less fuel and accumulated 800 fewer engine hours. Overall, fuel economy was 6.83 mpg for the hybrid versus 5.60 mpg for the diesel-powered model.

“Initial acceptance by operators was also good,” Allison added, “and we found that savings were application-driven. Also, while we did have some performance complaints, those were corrected through software changes.”

Florida Power & Light also reported “strong user acceptance” for the initial 24 Class 6-7 hybrid trucks in its operation. At the time, the fleet had 36 months of service on its first hybrid units and more than 1 million miles of combined road service on the group of trucks. “At over 99 percent, availability of the hybrid trucks has been high,” said Claude Masters, manager, vehicle acquisition and fuel. “In addition, the hybrid trucks showed fuel savings of 32 to 47 percent [measured in gallons per hour].

“Factors affecting fuel economy include highway driving conditions and engine-off PTO operation,” Masters also reported. “Realizing efficiencies with hybrid vehicles comes from matching the equipment to the mission.”

Pacific Gas and Electric Company is also a user of alternative power trucks. “Making effective choices,” noted Dave Meisel, director, transportation services, “is about looking at the highest value proposition elements, and because fuel savings are very duty-cycle dependent, no one type of alternative fuel vehicle fits all applications. In addition, there are price and return-on-investment questions that need to be asked and answered because performance varies significantly between makes, models and manufacturers.”

Meisel also defined two other issues to address when considering alternative vehicles. Included were employee challenges, such as familiarity with the operation of the equipment and the availability of qualified technicians. Also to be considered are parts availability
and technical issues related to batteries and charging systems.

Today’s natural gas trucks are ready to handle utility tasks, said Dave Bryant, manager, vocational sales at Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA), during the 2010 EUFMC. DTNA, he noted, has put more than 2,000 natural gas units into service in a range of applications, including utility, municipal and construction fleets.

DTNA’s factory-installed natural gas solution for the Freightliner M2 112 platform features the Cummins Westport ISL G 8 engine. The five models offered in liquefied natural gas (LNG) or compressed natural gas (CNG) versions include 250, 260, 280, 300 and 320 HP options with peak torque from 660 to 1,000 lbs./ft. at 1,300 rpm. For its M2 natural gas models, the OEM offers CNG tanks in 60 diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) and 75 DGE configurations. Factory-installed LNG options include 119- and 147-gallon tanks, which equate to 65 and 86 DGE, respectively.

All Freightliner natural gas vehicles include a standard methane detection system. The system encompasses sensors mounted in the cab, engine compartment and outside the cab near the fuel tank to provide visual and audible warnings of fuel leaks. Freightliner and Cummins Westport also provide on-site fleet customer training, as well as engine and fuel system maintenance and troubleshooting services.

Bryant pointed out several benefits of natural gas engines beyond lower operating costs than diesel. “With the same rated speed as an ISL diesel, the ISL G provides 30 percent more torque at idle, and it is quieter,” he said. “Other advantages include a maintenance-free three-way catalyst and no need for additional emissions control devices, diesel particulate filter regeneration or ash cleaning.

“When you look at fuel choices, natural gas is a great choice to meet short-haul and vocational needs,” Bryant said. “It is less expensive than diesel fuel, and NG-powered engines have a lower cost of operation than their diesel counterparts.”

Liquid propane autogas, another viable alternative for fleet vehicles, took center stage at the 2011 National Truck Equipment Association’s Work Truck Show. There, ROUSH CleanTech announced its new 6.8-liter V10 propane autogas-powered Ford F-550 super duty chassis cab. The propane autogas fuel system will be available for 2012 and later models of the Ford F-450 and F-550 truck series, and is expected to ship beginning in October 2011.

The fuel system is currently in development and will be EPA and California Air Resources
Board (CARB) certified at launch. The system will be available as a Ford ship-through option for installation on new vehicles, or as a retrofit option for vehicles already in service.

While ROUSH CleanTech is still finalizing the details on tank capacity and options, the plan is to offer up to three tank configurations for the Ford F-450 and F-550 propane autogas fuel system – an in-bed tank and two under-bed tanks. The fuel tank choices will be able to be combined to conform to various body configurations and to meet the range requirements of customers. The system, equipped with a five-speed automatic transmission, will work on all cab and wheelbase configurations, as well as 4×2 or 4×4 vehicles.

“Going green is not just for light-duty vehicles anymore,” said Joe Thompson, president of ROUSH CleanTech. “Propane autogas offers so many benefits to fleets in terms of safety, economics, environmental soundness and convenience. There are thousands of refueling stations across the U.S., and many fleets are installing low-cost on-site refueling infrastructure to eliminate the need for off-site stations.”

Propane autogas burns cleaner than gasoline or diesel, with 20 percent less nitrogen oxide, up to 60 percent less carbon monoxide, 17 to 24 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions and fewer particulate emissions when compared to gasoline. When compared to diesel fuel, the emissions reductions are even greater. Propane autogas also offers up to 40 percent reduction in fuel costs when compared to gasoline.

In the Shop
Southern California Edison (SCE) has been honored for green shop efforts at its Wildomar, Calif. facility, achieving Platinum certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program sponsored by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The USGBC process includes a green building rating system covering Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality and Innovation in Design.

During the 2010 EUFMC, James Kennedy, manager, presented details on SCE’s Greening Utility Fleet Garage Facilities activities. The Wildomar service center site is home to a
21,116-square-foot, two-story garage with six truck bays, a welding bay and a wash bay, along with an office building, an assembly space and a yard management warehouse.

“In the shop we focused on environmentally-sensitive planning, design and construction,”
Kennedy said. “For example, skylights and glass bay doors in the garage were placed to optimize the use of natural light. Also used were low volatile organic compound-emitting, nontoxic paints, coatings, adhesives, carpets and floor coverings to promote high indoor air quality. In addition, the building has an HVAC system with CO2 monitoring devices and HEPA filters to regulate fresh-air ventilation when indoor CO2 levels reach a predetermined threshold.”

Kennedy went on to say that the Wildomar service center is a model for new building construction at SCE. “We’re committed to environmental protection,” he stated. “Beyond meeting regulatory requirements, we’re developing and implementing programs and practices that improve air and water quality, reduce solid waste and conserve natural resources. In addition, we’re benefiting by reducing operating costs and by providing a healthier, more comfortable work environment for our employees.”

SCE also earned LEED credits for its green building education practices by providing public information on the sustainable features of the Wildomar facility. The utility has also been awarded credits for its green housekeeping program that promotes the use of nontoxic cleaning supplies, for achieving water savings through the use of high-efficiency plumbing and landscaping fixtures, and for the purchase of renewable energy credits to offset the facility’s energy usage.

SCE, one of the nation’s largest electric utilities, operates 1,900 medium-duty trucks and 3,000 passenger and light-duty vehicles, along with 1,000 heavy-duty units and 1,100 pieces of equipment. The fleet is maintained in 44 shops staffed by 246 technicians.

Utility Fleet Professional

360 Memorial Drive, Suite 10, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 | 815.459.1796

KNOWLEDGE, INSIGHT & STRATEGY FOR UTILITY FLEET LEADERS

Utility Fleet Professional is produced by Utility Business Media, Inc.   View Capabilities Statement

Get the Utility Fleet Professional Digital Edition App
Get the Utility Fleet Professional Digital Edition App

Get the iP Digital Edition App


© All rights reserved.
Back to Top